Sephora

Sephora’s 20 million Instagram followers will soon find it even easier to buy online.

Instagram has built a digital storefront for Sephora and customers can purchase straight from the beauty retailer’s feed and Stories. The in-app store allows Sephora fans to shop at a time when the retailer’s doors remain largely closed due to the coronavirus. More than 80 brands are available in Sephora’s Instagram store, launching June 24, including Drunk Elephant, Christophe Robin, Dae, Sephora Collection, Drybar, Innisfree, Lawless, Marc Jacobs Beauty, Olaplex, Shani Darden Skin Care, Sulwhasoo, Summer Fridays, Sunday Riley, Supergoop, Tatcha, Too Faced, Urban Decay and Youth to the People.

Sephora, which reportedly carries more than 290 brands, recently took Brother Vellies’ founder Aurora James’ 15 Percent Pledge, promising to dedicate at least 15 percent of its shelf space to Black-owned beauty brands. The retailer did not specify how it will divide the 15 percent among its various beauty categories.

Sephora’s Instagram storefront will help brands “scale their businesses” on the social platform, according to a statement. Of the more than 80 brands debuting on it, only one — Shani Darden Skin Care — appears to be Black-owned.

“Sephora is thrilled to work with Instagram on this unique social shopping experience,” Carolyn Bojanowski, senior vice president and general manager of e-commerce for Sephora, said in a statement. “Our clients engage with social media in so many ways, like drawing inspiration from the community, getting tips from experts or learning about new beauty trends, so we’re always looking for new ways to enhance that beauty journey.”

“Beauty lovers come to @sephora every day to discover products and connect with brands,” Eva Chen, Instagram’s vice president of fashion partnerships, said in a statement. “Together with Sephora, we want to make shopping inspiring and seamless for this community.”

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