L'Oréal

PARIS — As access to water becomes more difficult globally, L’Oréal and Swiss environmental tech start-up Gjosa have worked together to create a low-flow showerhead through which easier-to-rinse shampoos are applied and can be washed away with five-times less water than usually needed.

With the device, a shampoo rinse takes just 1.5 liters of water, versus the typical 8 liters.

Bienne, Switzerland-based Gjosa’s showerhead emits 2 liters of water per minute and breaks up the water flow while speeding up the droplet rate, so the rinse remains as effective as before, according to L’Oréal. The French beauty giant created the shampoos to be used in the device.

“Some water jet parameters have been adjusted in real conditions to obtain the right rinse, without splashes, reducing the water and energy consumption by almost 70 percent,” L’Oréal said.

Global water consumption is growing twice faster than the world’s population, according to the company. It cited a United Nation’s statistic that in 2025, two-thirds of the world’s population might be living under water-stressed conditions. Already today, water scarcity is impacting 2 billion people.

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Gjosa cofounders Amin Abdulla and Luc Amgwerd said in a statement that the exclusive partnership with L’Oréal, “as based on the expectations of consumers, it uses cutting-edge technology to bring them down the road of sustainable development, while offering a totally new consumer experience.”

“This breakthrough technology is perfectly in line with our commitments to sustainable innovation,” said Laurent Attal, L’Oréal executive vice president research and innovation.

The showerhead prototypes, tested in L’Oréal laboratories, are now being trialed in some hair salons in South Africa and the U.S. The technology is expected to be rolled out to the professional hair salon market.

L’Oréal’s research team is 3,885 people strong. The group’s sustainability commitment for 2020 is called Sharing Beauty With All.

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