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Secret Deodorant’s Latest Campaign Addresses Gender Pay Gap

"I'd Rather Get Paid" targets the digitally native generation of female deodorant users.

Secret is going beyond deodorant with its latest campaign.

The Procter & Gamble-owned women’s deodorant and antiperspirant brand is on Monday, Nov. 19, releasing its “I’d Rather Get Paid” campaign, which is targeted at the digitally native generation and addresses the gender pay gap.

The campaign is entirely digital, and is anchored by a music video featuring a diverse group of famous women who have been known to speak out against wage inequality between men and women, including actors Sophia Bush and Samira Wiley, former television host Catt Sadler, women’s soccer player Abby Wambach and WNBA player Swin Cash. The brand has tapped a group of influencers, including several members of the U.S. women’s soccer team, to promote the campaign on social media. There’s also a partnership with Spotify, in which consumers will be able to download on the streaming platform the original track featured in the music video, and place it as background music on Instagram Stories.

“We have a relatively new, predominately female team [at Secret],” said Sara Saunders, associate brand director, personal care at Procter & Gamble. “We need to use our voice as a brand. Sweat and stress have so much impact on women physically and emotionally — we wanted to start addressing stories that have a broader effect on women’s lives.”

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It’s not the first time Secret has done a campaign addressing social issues. In 2012, the brand tapped Demi Lovato to be the face of its anti-bullying program, and in 2016, the brand released a campaign encouraging women to ask for a raise.

The new campaign is coming at a time when Procter & Gamble is placing increased emphasis on addressing social issues, especially regarding inclusivity and equality, in its marketing campaigns. In September, Olay launched the #FaceAnything campaign, which encourages women to embrace individuality.

With Secret’s new campaign, the brand is also looking to keep Millennials in its core consumer group. “Our target lives and breathes online,” said Saunders. The deodorant category has experienced a shake-up in recent years, as many younger consumers opt for aluminum-free or natural formulas. In November 2017, it was announced that P&G had acquired Native Deodorant, a direct-to-consumer natural deodorant brand. Secret, in 2019, is rolling out its own aluminum-free formula.