The Smell Test: Michael Kors Wonderlust

The Smell Test

Michael Kors Wonderlust

The Score: 3.4 out of 10

The Verdict:

Hello again. To some judges, this scent is a commercially viable retro creation. Others said it struck them as an unwelcome reminder of the past, lacking originality. The Eighties came up, and it wasn’t necessarily a compliment. — Pete Born

“Bold, diffusive. The Eighties ride again! Been there. Done that!”

Artistic: 4

Innovation: 2

“Smells like yesterday’s herbal tea left in the pot. Weak and confused.”

Artistic: 3

Innovation: 3

“This fragrance is awful, ordinary and without class.”

Artistic: 2

Innovation: 2

“Hints of Thierry Mugler’s Alien, and a nod to Burberry Brit. On trend and commercially viable for today’s fragrance market.”

Artistic: 7

Innovation: 3

“It is very reminiscent of a late Eighties-style perfume — not as heavy. I find this to be a nice, very likable perfume — not great but not bad. The inspiration is interesting to see new ways of achieving a new vibrancy and at the same time using old methods to make this retro-modern fragrance.”

Artistic score: 4

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Innovation: 4

“A memorably unmemorable, sweet, fruity floral scent, memorably leaves an insipid and weak residue within two hours on skin.”

Artistic: 2

Innovation: 2

“Good construction but very classical. However, diffusion and long-lasting aspects are excellent. Good-quality fragrance, but nothing innovative, surprising and new under the sun. The ingredients make the scent not the architecture.”

Artistic: 6

Innovation: 5

“Patchouli suffered in vain for the sake of something so bland. Technically, it’s a decent perfume, but it’s devoid of character.”

Artistic: 4

Innovation: 3

“Nothing is really agreeable in it, it is quite cheap! No facets, no creativity, no intention to make the clients enter into your fantasy. There is no emotion.”

Artistic: 2

Innovation: 3

ABOUT THE TEST AND JUDGES: This is a blind test, panelists are given vials of unidentified scent to judge impartially. Each of them gives a score ranging from 1 (forgettable) to 10 (unforgettable) and the numbers are computed into a final grade. The judges, led by chairman Michael Edwards, also make critiques, which are unattributed to encourage candor. The most promising scents are picked for judging in an effort to find and showcase excellence. WWD buys the products at retail, like any other consumer. The esteemed judges are: Michael Edwards, author of “Fragrances of the World” and “Perfume Legends”; Paul Austin, chief executive officer of sensory storytelling agency Austin Advisory Group; Jean-Claude Delville, senior perfumer at Drom; Victoria Frolova, fragrance industry analyst and Bois de Jasmin editor; Christophe Laudamiel, master perfumer at DreamAir; Nathalie Pichard, owner of training and evaluation agency Topnotes; Chantal Roos, cocreator of Roos & Roos Co.; Luca Turin, biophysicist and perfume critic for arabia.style.com, and Kevin Verspoor, founder of PerfumeKev LLC.