Just because something is natural doesn’t mean its good for irritated skin.

Skinfix, a brand that addresses eczema, seems to agree.

“Eczema is chronic, and it’s tripled since the Seventies,” said Amy Gordinier-Regan, president of Skinfix.

A year ago, the line arrived in the U.S. at C.O. Bigelow from Canada with an objective of quick expansion. 

Goal accomplished. 

In mid-October, Skinfix will launch in all 1,800 Target doors.

Similar to Francesco Clark, who saw a need for botanically based skin care that would help his sensitive skin after a spinal-cord injury left him paralyzed, Gordinier-Regan saw white space for products that could help heal eczema.

The so-called Body Repair Line assortment, priced $17.99 to $31.99, will consist of three fragrance-free products: the Body Repair Balm, a waterless healing ointment; the Hand Repair Cream, which contains 1 percent colloidal oatmeal, and the Daily Lotion, which is infused with sunflower, jojoba and grape-seed oil.

“We’ve experienced double-digit growth in these [natural-based, dermatologist-recommended] categories over the past few years,” noted Christina Hennington, senior vice president of health and beauty at Target.

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Meanwhile, Skinfix will launch, at the end of October in Canada, a skin-care product for diabetics. 

“One of the first things that [diabetics] start to notice is that their skin is starting to dry out,” said Francine Krenicki, Skinfix’s senior vice president of product development. “It’s because the internal moisture in their body is too busy getting rid of the excess glucose.”

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention just released statistics indicating that 9.3 percent of the population in North America has diabetes and that 27.8 percent of them are undiagnosed, Krenicki added.

If Skinfix sees success with the Body Repair Line, it will introduce the other categories into the U.S.

For the eczema line, Skinfix is investing heavily in advertising, with a digital campaign and print ads that will appear in consumer beauty, lifestyle and health-and-wellness magazines.

While Gordinier-Regan declined to comment on financials, industry sources estimate the Body Repair Line could do about $10 million during its first year at Target.

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