Followers of fashion certainly know designer André Courrèges’ Sixties Space-Age designs. But will 21st-century consumers?

This story first appeared in the December 12, 2014 issue of WWD. Subscribe Today.

Estée Lauder is banking on it.

The venerable flagship of the Estée Lauder Cos. Inc. is teaming with Courrèges’ owners and copresidents, Jacques Bungert and Frédéric Torloting, on a 13-piece limited-edition color cosmetics collection. The line, due in March, will be sold in about 900 high-end specialty store doors globally, including Selfridges in London, Colette in Paris and 10 Corso Como in Milan.

Bungert and Torloting, who purchased the brand from André Courrèges and his wife Coqueline in January 2011, have wasted no time in getting their beauty prospects in order. After inking a fragrance deal with Lorience Paris in July 2011, they terminated the contract in October 2013 following the launch of three fragrances with the house: Empreinte, Eau de Courrèges and Blanc. Like Oscar de la Renta before them, Bungert and Torloting brought the business in-house.

However, there is nothing but optimism on both sides of the color cosmetics deal.

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“Our makeup collaboration recognizes Courrèges’ philosophy of pop luxury — bringing a sense of surprise, fun and optimism to the world of beauty,” noted Jane Hertzmark Hudis, global brand president for Estée Lauder. She added that during the Space Age, “when a culture of futurism subsequently consumed the era, there were two names firmly in the vanguard: Estée Lauder and André Courrèges. She, a beauty industry innovator whose ‘every woman can be beautiful’ mantra was ahead of its time; he, a fashion force whose avant-garde aesthetic broke all the style rules by injecting an air of playfulness, movement and egalitarianism into every one of his haute couture collections.”

“These days, there are a lot of market collaborations,” said Bungert. “This is more than that. This is about two companies coming together and sharing a vision that includes luxury teamed with quality and optimism. This is the Sixties, back in a very modern way.”

The products were designed to be “surprising in their lightness, in their sensorial delivery, their translucency, reflectivity, and in their pop-y palette,” said Sarah Creal, global collaborations and product development at Estée Lauder. “They are an invitation to have fun with color, texture and special effects.”

Lip Visor, $26, is a high-shine lip gloss in two colors, clear and coral: while Super Gloss, $26, is a high-pigment pink lipstick. Super Lashes, a $32 set of false eyelashes, is designed to evoke the spiderlike lashes popular in the Sixties (although users will have to go elsewhere for the lash glue). Eye Amplifier is a $26 eye shadow offered in Aqua Silver and Black Silver, while Eye Glide, $22, is a creamy silver pencil. Iridescent Ball Highlighter, $26, is a cream that can be dabbed on the face for glow; Lip + Cheek Ball, $26, accomplishes the same for the lips. Ultra White Eyeliner, $26, is an opaque white, while Illuminations Face Powder delivers what Creal calls “a burst of bright light.” Hair Mascara, $32, and a Kabuki brush, $36, round out the collection. The collection will be promoted primarily via social media, said Hudis.

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