S.W. Basics has a new Orange Blossom hydrosol.

Flower water hydrosols are gaining traction in the natural skin-care market. But, according to Adina Grigore, founder of S.W. Basics, most of the products being marketed as hydrosols are waters that are merely scented with additives.

A core principle of S.W. Basics, which Grigore launched in 2011, is to make products with five ingredients or less.

To that end, she revealed her first hydrosol last year, a Rosewater spray with real rose petals. “It immediately became our bestseller,” she said. Now she’s expanding the collection with three more choices — Lavender, Peppermint and Orange Blossom. The wider array affords shoppers the chance to select the core ingredient that works with their skin or is a personal preference.

The introduction of her hydrosols opened up an opportunity Grigore to achieve a goal she set when she started her business in her Brooklyn, N.Y., kitchen — shelf space at Whole Foods. The four items are rolling out to all Whole Foods doors and will be sold in the essential oil and aromatherapy department — an interesting twist for the food retailer that often only puts brands in a smattering of stores at first. “Whole Foods has always been my dream since Day One. I think of us as aligned with people who are eating healthy and reading their labels and that’s what we are trying to do as a beauty brand.” From observations in stores, Whole Foods is putting new muscle behind the beauty assortments.

Grigore handpicked the ingredients to infuse into the waters for their benefits. Orange Blossom can help tighten mature skin, Peppermint Water for its calming characteristics and Lavender Water is soothing and good for sensitive skin. “My goal was to find ingredients that aren’t too exotic and are accessible,” she said. The hydrosols retail for $12.99.

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The Rosewater and Orange Blossom hydrosols will also be sold at Target and S.W. Basics’ online store. Target was the first retailer to select S.W. Basics as it enriched its natural selection two years ago and the chain carries a wide array of the brand’s products.

With an interest in eating healthy, Grigore lamented that the clean food trends didn’t always translate into the beauty aisle. “The food industry was obsessing over ingredients and you’d go over to the beauty aisle and labels are confusing and filled with junk. A lot of what I do with my books and products is help people learn how to read a label,” she said.

For the future, Grigore plans to stay consistent with the five or less strategy. “I don’t want to just jump on a trend.”

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