Masayuki-Ino

When Doublet won the 2018 LVMH Prize, Masayuki Ino became the first non-Europe-based designer to do so, giving his fledgling brand a much-deserved boost. In the past, Ino has described his collections as “daily wear with strangeness,” and since the beginning social media has played a large part in the way he communicates his message to the world; he still manages his Instagram account entirely on his own. So it followed suit that his presentation, titled “Strangest Comfort,” would essentially be a walk-through of his Instagram account, highlighting his biggest achievements and most interesting moments to date.

Ino founded Doublet in 2012, and it quickly became one of Japan’s most buzz-worthy brands, continually innovating and receiving awards. At the ceremony announcing last year’s LVMH Prize recipient, Clare Waight Keller called Ino a “modern-day Issey Miyake” due to his experimental, boundary-pushing methods of clothing production.

In his talk, Ino touched on several career highlights, from a skateboard-shaped clutch bag covered in velcro — a collaboration with Japanese bag brand NewNeu — to the plastic-covered shirts that he unveiled in 2017. As his presentation also focused on his social media presence, he showed two videos that the brand created for Instagram, showing how to unpackage and wear the shirts. Both videos featured the same demonstrator, dressed as a man in one and in drag in the other, hinting at the unisex nature of Ino’s designs. Another video, similarly retro in its aesthetic, depicts a man opening what appears to be a cup of instant ramen and pouring water into it, before it is revealed that the water expands a compressed T-shirt packaged inside the cup.

Ino also discussed some of his collaborations, including one he did with Valentino last year. His signature deconstructed and layered embroidery was mixed with the Valentino logo on T-shirts and sweatshirts sold exclusively at the Italian brand’s Ginza store. The items sold out in a matter of hours.

Asked what he wants to make next or if there’s a brand he’d particularly like to work with, Ino was at a loss to respond.

“It all comes down to that moment,” he said. “I just make what I feel like making each time.”

load comments
blog comments powered by Disqus