mobile shopping

Poq, the app commerce company, predicts to see 25 percent of e-commerce traffic coming from apps in 2020.

The report predicts a 31 percent increase in app story interactions over Cyber Week. In research, the company found 16 percent of consumers are “quicker” to add first products to bags during Cyber Week and a higher intent to buy. On just Black Friday, 387,000 hours were spent on apps in 2018.

According to the company, apps help to drive engagement, especially when experience meets consumer expectations. Features like shoppable Instagram stories saw a 31 percent increase in interactions over Cyber Week. Further apps that sent notifications using the term “deal” had a 50 percent higher direct open rate than average.

Poq advises brands and retailers to use emojis in notifications to “connect with customers and stand out.”

Consumer behavior changes around big sales days like Black Friday. Customers opt to shop with the most convenient, relevant and engaging shopping experiences,” said Oyvind Henriksen, chief executive officer and cofounder of Poq. “Retailers globally are recognizing the importance of apps. By adapting to these evolving habits, retailers are building authentic consumer relationships and generating more revenue.”

As consumers continue to seek convenience, app shopping has become commonplace. Within the 85 percent of e-commerce traffic for retailers with apps, 21 percent came from shopping apps in 2019. In the company’s research, seasonal clothing, like coats and jumpers, was found to be the top searched category on shopping apps out of more than 6 million searches.

To facilitate product discovery Poq advises retailers to adopt features that are unique to the app platform and give a “sense of gamifying the experience.” One example is a swipe-to-like feature. The feature is similar to Tinder’s swiping structure and presents shoppers with new product images to discard or add to a wish list.

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