MILAN — The Italian government has passed a number of regulations to safeguard Made in Italy. The norms are part of the so-called “growth decree,” approved this week.

In order to protect Italian companies that are more than 50 years old, the country’s Ministry of Economic Development will issue the Historical Brand of National Interest mark “aimed at safeguarding job positions and the continuation of production activities on the national territory,” the law reads.

In addition, owners of historical brands will be compelled to keep the original sites of production open in order to maintain the right to use the label’s name and to find new investors when aiming to relocate production abroad or to cease operations. The government has pledged to earmark 30 million euros to support the measures.

Aiming to guarantee an item is actually made in the country and to fight against the “Italian-sounding” phenomenon, the country’s government will also issue a Made in Italy mark, flanked by the emblem of the Italian Republic. According to the law text, the mark answers “the numerous requests from the production world to provide it with a better safeguard on the goods’ origin, in the wake of the growing issues linked to counterfeiting seen in recent years on foreign markets [extra-EU].”

As reported, according to two reports issued by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, and Indicam, Italy’s institute fighting counterfeiting for the protection of intellectual property rights, the value of counterfeit and pirated Italian goods sold worldwide in 2016 totaled 32 billion euros, equivalent to be equivalent to 3.6 percent of global Italian manufacturing sales.

In accordance with the European laws, the mark will be employed in extra-European countries only and it can be requested by the companies producing in Italy on a voluntary basis.

As reported, the measures were proposed last February by Italy’s right-wing Lega [League] party and a draft of the law was first submitted at the beginning of April, before this week’s approval.

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