Ming Xi, Liu Wen and Yang Choayue at a Chinese airport.

LONDON — The travel industry has taken some of the heaviest blows amid the coronavirus outbreak.

Beijing on Thursday issued a travel ban to most foreigners entering China and sharply cut international flight routes to stop imported cases.

Each Chinese airline is only allowed to maintain one route to any specific country, with no more than one flight a week, and each foreign airline is only allowed to maintain one route to China with no more than one weekly flight, according to the Civil Aviation Administration of China.

People are cautious, but also optimistic.

Some 45 percent of respondents said they will travel again when there are “zero new confirmed and suspected cases oversea,” according to an eMarketer survey.

Looking at the mid- to long-term, as life and work go back to normal in China, and the Wuhan lockdown is to be lifted on April 8, making travel plans is already on top of everybody’s mind.

Around 80 percent of affluent Millennials from China’s first-tier cities said they will travel more after the outbreak, according to a report from Ruder Finn and Consumer Search Group.

Another report from China Luxury Advisors said 38 percent of respondents want to travel more after the outbreak is over, and 43 percent want to go somewhere and relax. Japan, Oceania, Korea, and Northern Europe are some of the most desirable destinations.

Thailand, Japan, Singapore, Vietnam and Dubai are the top five desired international destinations, according to a survey conducted in March by Ctrip, China’s largest travel booking agency.

Family travel and shopping are the dominant themes of international travel. Japan, Singapore, the U.K., Germany and Italy top the list in this category.

Costal city Sanya on Hainan Island is the most desired domestic destination, followed by luxury spending hot spot Chengdu and the mountainous region Guizhou, finance capital Shanghai and Xi’an, the former capital of several ancient Chinese dynasties. Family, historic town and food are the most popular reasons for domestic travel.

Chinese travelers account for around 10 percent of international tourists and are the biggest spenders on luxury resorts, restaurants and luxury goods.