Anna Wintour

There’s been a lot of pre-holiday job news as companies have rushed to put out their announcements in the past few weeks.

First up, here’s a round-up of all the major changes happening at Condé Nast. The biggest news has to be that Anna Wintour — who was seen as on thin ice this past summer — has instead been made even more powerful with the additional titles of chief content officer and global editorial director of Vogue. She was already artistic director and editor in chief of American Vogue.

Elsewhere in the Condé Nast reshuffle aimed at streamlining editions in a bid to save costs: Edward Enninful, editor in chief of British Vogue, has been named European editorial director of Vogue for the markets owned and operated by Condé Nast; Simone Marchetti, European editorial director of Vanity Fair; Amy Astley, global editorial director of AD; Divia Thani, global editorial director of Condé Nast Traveler, and Will Welch, global editorial director of GQ. The deputy editorial directors for AD, Condé Nast Traveler and GQ will be Oliver Jahn, Jesse Ashlock and Adam Baidawi, respectively.

The reshuffle, which took place last week, helped explain a number of prominent European executives and editors mysteriously departing in the days leading up to the announcement. They included Vogue Germany and Spain editors in chief Christiane Arp and Eugenia de la Torriente, respectively; Condé Nast Italia’s chief executive officer Fedele Usai, and Condé Nast Italia’s editorial director Luca Dini.

In the U.S., two other big names also exited the publisher, but that was not because of the reshuffle. Wintour’s longtime right-hand man and Condé Nast head creative director Raul Martinez left to take on the role of creative director at struggling lingerie retailer Victoria’s Secret, while Wired editor in chief Nicholas Thompson is switching to the business side of media as The Atlantic’s new ceo.

At rival Meredith Corp., its digital push continues with two new hires. The publisher of People and InStyle has promoted chief business and data officer Alysia Borsa to president of digital at its magazine arm, while Tastemade’s head of content Amanda Dameron will join in the newly created role of chief digital content officer in January. 

And while Meredith is making a digital play, Hearst appears to be looking to better manage print, just naming O, The Oprah Magazine’s longtime editor in chief Lucy Kaylin vice president of print content of its magazines division. It’s not forgetting about digital, though, as its currently searching for a new head of digital at Elle to replace Katie Connor, who recently joined W as executive digital director.

Outside of the magazine world, The New York Times has made a hire from The Skimm, tapping Lori Leibovich as editor of Well, its desk devoted to coverage of personal health and wellness. At The Skimm, she was senior vice president of content and before that editor in chief of Time’s Health magazine.

The Washington Post, meanwhile, is continuing with its hiring spree, just advertising new breaking news jobs in London and Seoul. It plans to add a total of 150 jobs next year — finally some good news for those working in media.

In the opposite direction, The Financial Times is cutting 64 jobs before the year ends, according to media reports. They’re said to include 20 editorial positions and 19 jobs at FT Chinese.

 

For more, see:

Where Did the Glossy Magazine Masthead Go?

Condé Nast Promotes Anna Wintour to Chief Content Officer

W Brings On Elle’s Katie Connor as Digital Head