By and and
with contributions from Jessica Saltz
 on January 14, 2015

Retail activity in Berlin continues to boom in a big way — as illustrated by the sprawling Mall of Berlin, Germany’s largest high-end shopping center, which opened last fall on Leipziger Platz with more than 270 stores and 850,000 square feet of sales space.

In March, 30,000 square feet on Soho House’s main and lower levels will be put into action with The Store. Creative director Alex Eagle devoted two years to honing the concept and making her selection of designer fashion, design, beauty, furniture, music, art and more, all housed in a breathtaking expanse that includes creative work spaces, a café and bar, a library, a studio, a screening room, a barber/hair salon and more.
But big isn’t the only way to go when it comes to the city’s freshest retail hot spots, as a number of more intimate spaces have opened as well. Here, a roundup of some of Berlin’s most inspiring, smaller shopping destinations.

Rianna + Nina
In what could best be described as a mini pocket square of a store, former marketing exec Nina Kuhn and vintage expert Rianna Konou have created a boundless world of pattern, fun and fantasy out of silk scarves and fabrics from around the world and times gone by. On offer: floor and throw pillows from about $110 to $800; quilted handbags with a certain Rue Cambon charm from $395 to $675; small and large lamp shades; made-to-order chaise longues; vintage jewelry and lamp bases; and new custom pieces such as jackets composed of hooked or crewel rugs or a 12-meter-long scarf of assembled antique fabrics.

Rianna + Nina
4 Steinstrasse, 10119 Berlin (Hackesche Markt)
Tel.: +49-30-288-791-22
Web: riannaandnina.com
facebook.com/riannaandnina
Hours: Monday to Saturday, noon to 7 p.m.

Wunderkind
Wolfgang Joop’s luxury brand has moved west, leaving Mitte to take up new quarters on Berlin’s most historic and, some would add, most established shopping mile, Kurfürstendamm. Don’t be misled by the cool and collected exterior. Inside, Joop’s eclectic vision is in full force, from the tony smoked-oak floors and tinted walls behind Plexiglas to the handcrafted furniture and screens patched, embroidered and otherwise embellished by Beirut-based design label Bokja to Wunderkind’s equally enriched and individual signature fashion looks.

Wunderkind
46 Kurfürstendamm, 10707 (Charlottenburg)
Tel.: +49-30-280-418-17
Web: wunderkind.com/boutiques
Hours: Monday to Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Lala Berlin
Local darling Leyla Piedayesh is taking it a step further with her new Lala Berlin flagship. Designed by Amir Abadi, the 2,580-square-foot space on Mitte’s Alte Schönhauser Strasse plays on the city’s contrasts with a mix of raw concrete, black cubism and a brass rack installation.
Besides the complete Lala Berlin collection, which commands prices ranging from $118 to $1,798, the futurist flagship-meets-concept-store also features accessories and other small products handpicked by Piedayesh and her team. Among those chosen are German jewelry stars Ina Beissner and Saskia Diez, classic Roeckl gloves and hats, Bon Maison socks and Annabel Ingall handbags.

Lala Berlin
3 Alte Schönhauser Strasse  (Mitte)
Tel.: +49-30-200-953-63
Web: lalaberlin.com
Hours: Monday to Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Hotel Ultra
If hotels aim to be accommodating to their guests, then Hotel Ultra is more than accommodating to its product range. The interior and design concept store situated on buzzing Torstrasse welcomes interior design, accessories and furniture brands as if they were the inhabitants of a hotel. The 36 keys on the wall allude to the 36 brands temporarily occupying imaginary rooms at the hotel, and smaller decor items travel in style in suitcase-themed bags.

And since hospitality is the key in hotels, a concierge service is offered to visitors when the store is open, advising about the “hotel guests,” but also on other hot spots on Torstrasse.

The Hotel Ultra Café, behind the reception desk, is equipped with current brands such as Autoban furniture (the only long-term label), Menu plates and Taschen coffee-table books. It invites customers to experience the products as well as have a taste of coffee and cake.

Hotel Ultra
Torstrasse (Mitte)
Tel.: +49-30-275-811-00
Web: hotelultra.de
Hours: Monday to Saturday, 11:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.

No Wódka Art & Design
“When Germans think about Poland, they think about vodka, cheap cigarettes and cleaning ladies,” according to Aleksandra Kozlowska. With her design shop, she hopes to change expectations about her home country; all products are designed and produced in Poland.

Offerings include cute mouse-in-straw photo-printed bed sets (from $109); Kaja Kusztra’s Great Inventors Kristoff porcelain line (an illustrated plate with computer programmer Ada Lovelace is $28), and Oskar Zieta’s inflated ultra-thin steel Plopp stool ($336).

Kozlowska’s shop also provides space for Polish creatives to exhibit. Young photographer Sonia Szóstak, who has shot for Rolling Stone and PhotoVogue Italia, is showing. A fashion installation from Mariusz Przybylski, who also sells at No Wódka, will be feted Jan. 22.

No Wódka Art & Design
Pappelallee 10 (Prenzlauer Berg)
Tel.: +49-179-913-40-38
E-mail: info@nowodka.com
Web: nowodka.com
Hours: Monday to Saturday, noon to 7 p.m.

École Boutique
Viola Jaeger’s Très Bonjour accessories and clothing line is making latex luxe. In her latest venture, École Boutique, she handpicks product from other rising lights.
There’s fashion from Berlin’s Dawid Tomaszewski and Don’t Shoot the Messengers, sunglasses from Lunettes Kollektion, and jewelry from Kjeld, alongside gloves from Paris’ Thomasine Barnekow and London-based Úna Burke’s strappy leather accessories.
The two-room shop has a chic Seventies vibe, with inset lighting, brass racks and sleek display cases doubling for storage. Jaeger encourages collaboration rather than competition among up-and-comers.
“It’s supporting the underdogs — but only the really good ones,” she insisted. Prices range from $153 for a mega-chunky necklace from Copenhagen’s Chaca to $4,279 for an intricate open leatherwork dress from Berlin’s Moga e Mago.

École Boutique
Torstrasse 3 (Mitte)
Tel.:  +49-30-223-612-06
Web: ecole-boutique.com
Hours: Monday to Saturday, noon to 8 p.m.

2. Stock
Designer Frank Leder celebrates German traditions and folkways by channeling them through a lens of artisan-level contemporary men’s wear. The painstakingly crafted garments show hints of their inspirations, which Leder finds in archival images and antique curios. His designs have a cult following in Japan but until now were not readily available for purchase in his home city.

This fall, Leder opened part of his large atelier as a shop. It’s on the 2. Stock — or second story, hence the no-nonsense name.

Highlights include stiff trousers of blue Deutschleder, a heavy cotton used for workwear, and refined jackets with removable horsehair lining. Prices start at $165 for a knit cap, trousers at $306, jackets at $611 and coats at $978.

2. Stock
139 Kantstrasse (Charlottenburg)
Tel.:  +49-30-695-675-48
Web: frank-leder.com
Hours: Tuesday to Friday, noon to 7 p.m.; Saturday by appointment

Jacks Beauty Department Pop-Up Store
Makeup Miriam Jacks has two successful beauty stores, one in Berlin’s Prenzlauer Berg and one in Munich, but her third, a pop-up, might just be the most fun.

Jacks Beauty Department in the Bikini Berlin concept mall unites supplies, styling and snacks in a playful atmosphere. A special fragrance counter features Danish niché line Zarkoperfume, 3 Farben Grün offers smoothies and salad options, and Blumenbett brings in pretty flowers. Services include brow styling ($19), blow-outs ($56 to $81), and makeup refreshing ($30). Brands range from detox range Gegengift to Brit nail polish Models Own to professional fave Make-up Designory.

It’s not all just for the ladies — there’s a barber’s corner and gents’ grooming brands Baxter of Hollywood and Brooklyn Soap Company.

Jacks Beauty Department Pop-Up Store
Bikini Berlin
Budapester Strasse 38-50 (Charlottenburg)
Tel.: +49-30-920-345-38
Web: jacks-beautydepartment.com
Hours: Monday to Saturday, 10 to 8 p.m.

Hans
Hans Weber believes in the personal touch when it comes to his store; the name above the door belongs to the man who is behind the counter no fewer than six days a week.

Former head of legendary Berlin jeans emporium City Jeans, before he was hired away by Premium’s F95 store, Weber has as a long-standing reputation in Berlin (and beyond) as the best man for advice when it comes to buying jeans. His brand-new store, off Kurfürstendamm, is slick and understated with a growing stock of high-end denim labels such as J Brand, Citizens of Humanity and True Religion,    as well as ready-to-wear from Malene Birger, Elizabeth and James and Equipment, among others. There are also bottles of local schnapps and vodka on sale for a post-shopping pick-me-up.

Hans
Meineke Strasse 25, 10719 (Charlottenburg),
Tel.:  +49-30-889-218-33
Web: hans-berlin.com
Hours: Monday to Saturday, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Fragment
While Berlin artists and designers Kay Wright and Veronika Filnova are busy with their fledgling apparel label, Fragment, they opened a store that celebrates fellow creators.

The powder-blue, 1,000-square-foot store in Mitte’s bustling shopping district is part gallery, part clothing store, part vintage trove and — with a creaky wooden staircase leading to a basement installation space — 100 percent Berlin.

The fragments come together nicely: a handpicked selection of designers — from sophisticated men’s wear by Marc Stone to theatrical women’s wear label Leopardessa, are for sale at the rear of the store, while the front is reserved for showing and promoting the work of young artists.

Fragment
Almstadtstrasse 5, 10119 (Mitte)
Web: fragment.berlin.com
Hours: Monday to Saturday, noon to 8 p.m.

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