Honorary president of the Italian Fashion chamber, attends a news conference in Milan, Italy, Tuesday, May 31, 2016. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno). (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)

The discreet attitude that he succeeded in preserving while navigating through the social life of the Milan fashion scene for decades also defined the funeral service of Beppe Modenese, who died in Milan on Nov. 21. The honorary chairman of the Italian Fashion Chamber would have turned 93 on Thursday.

Although his family decided to hold a low-key service, avoiding any type of official commemoration, some of the most prominent figures of the Italian fashion industry reunited on Wednesday at 9 a.m. in the Santa Maria della Passione church in the heart of Milan, which is located next to the city’s music conservatory — a nod to one of Modenese’s biggest passions. It’s not by chance that during the service Modenese’s family asked the priest to read only the tribute that orchestra director Riccardo Muti had published in the Italian newspaper Corriere della Sera.

Despite the fact that Milan is still facing a critical situation caused by the coronavirus, since the city is included in an area that has been defined as high risk by the Italian government, a range of designers and fashion executives joined Modenese’s nephew Alessandro Modenese and his wife Gloria Tanzini. They included Etro’s founder Gimmo Etro and two of his children, Veronica and Jacopo; as well as Domenico Dolce; Camera della Moda president Carlo Capasa; former Pitti Immagine president and fashion manager and investor Gaetano Marzotto; Mario Boselli, former president of the Camera della Moda, as well as a range of fashion heads of communication and publicists, including Etro’s Carlo Mengucci; Kering’s Niccolò Moschini; Emanuela Schmeidler, and Max Mara’s Giorgio Guidotti, among others.

Modenese will be buried in the family vault in Alba, his hometown.