NEW LINES AT THE MART

Byline: Georgia Lee

ATLANTA — The following lines have made their debuts at the Atlanta Apparel Mart.
Sonia Ratay
Michelle Harrison & Associates, 10S119
Sonia Ratay of New York is a new bridge-to-better line of desk-to-dinner wear.
Designer Sonia Ratay offers a European look in cocktail dresses and separates that emphasize blouses and skirts.
The line is done primarily in white, ivory and light pastel colors, and fabrics include satin, chiffon, crepe, organza and locally sourced nylon tulle.
“The line is finely detailed with lace, trims and embroidered with European-inspired motifs on the premises of our vertical company,” said Corey Bergman, vice president.
Carried in such stores as Saks Fifth Avenue and Neiman Marcus, the line is also seen in European and Asian catalogs.
“For a new line, we far exceeded our estimated sales — by 100 percent.” said Bergman.
Sizes range from 4 to 14, and wholesale prices are $59 to $99.

Nan Alexander
Mark Garland Studio, 9N104
San Francisco-based Nan Alexander began in 1990. Nancy Rosser, president/designer, recognized the demand for upscale knits in the American career market, and imported European yarns to make them.
“The line is styled for the serious career woman, 35 to 65 years old, making over $40,000 a year,” she said.
There is a wide range of shapes, from body-conscious to less structured silhouettes that go from office to dinner, in 18 colors, from pastels and neutrals to brights.
Nan Alexander is produced in plush fabrics like cashmere for fall, Italian cotton for spring and French linen knit for summer.
Wholesale prices range from $150 to $320.

Neil & David
Mark Garland Studio, 9N104
Neil & David is a new sportswear division of Kritesse Inc., a Costa Mesa, Calif., firm that also produces the labels Tea & Scones and Iced Tea. The Neil & David line, named after president Clive Rock’s children, includes georgettes, rayon, crepe and linen, and novelty fabrics like cut velvet, chenille and tapestry. The fit is loose and relaxed in shirts, skirts and cropped jackets embellished with expensive buttons. Produced in size XS to XL, the line wholesales from $28 to $120.

Iced Tea
Mark Garland Studio, 9N104
Iced Tea, a new sportswear division of Kritesse Inc., Costa Mesa, Calif., is a mixed media line of cropped jackets, cropped shirts, boyfriend jackets and related basic bottoms.
Clive Rock, president, describes the line as targeting the misses’ customer, 35 and older. Each garment is made of four to five fabrics and embellished with novelty buttons. This casual-to-better line is sized S, M, L, with a wholesale range of $36 to $98.

Bette Paige
Lisa Adams, 11W124B
Bette Paige, City of Industry, Calif., a contemporary knitwear line for casual day to evening, made its debut in 1996.
The line is trendy and fashion-forward, with short skirts, dresses and long-sleeved and short-sleeved sweaters with stretch woven bottoms, in neutral to bright colors. Men’s wear influences are evident in trouser-style pants.
Fabrics include cotton, rayon, nylon and Lycra spandex; design details are drawstrings and picot treatments. Knits and sweaters are in Lycra spandex and lace.
The target customer is “a 20-to-45-year-old body-conscious individual who wants body-hugging clothes,” said a spokeswoman.
Sizes run S, M, L and wholesale prices range from $30 to $100.

Lucie
Michael & Paula Hyman, 11W121
New York-based Urban Outfitters’ new contemporary sportswear division, Lucie, was previously a private label.
“The line includes dresses, tops, short and knee-length skirts, flat-front trousers and lingerie-inspired twinsets of tank tops and cardigans,” says Mari Joya, account executive.
Fabrics are rayon, cotton, stretch linen and stretch twill, and the palette comprises muted pastels of green, lavender, yellow, pink and light gray.
The target market is customers 20 to 40 years old, looking for softly molded silhouettes in medium fits.
Tops are sized S, M, L and bottoms run 4, 6, 8 and 10. Wholesale prices range from $11 to $43.

C:eed
Sylvia Overcast, 11S114
This Los Angeles-based better contemporary misses’ line includes chemise dresses, blazer jackets, pull-on trousers and long duster jackets, all in loose, easy-flowing lines.
Made of hand-loomed fabrics, hand-painted silks, doupioni silks, rayon and georgettes, the line includes recycled hand-loomed silk saris from India that feature reversible prints. The palette is neutrals and brights.
Each item has four to five patterns mixed in coordinated colors, detailed finishing on pockets and buttons on both sides.
The line is sized XS to XL, and wholesales for $21 to $64.

Vie
Michelle Harrison & Associates, 10S119
Vie by Victoria Royal of New York is a collection of evening separates.
Tops with ballgown-style skirts and dresses are paired with pants with fine details in beads and lace.
The line has a broad palette of ivory, black, white, navy, butter, sand, pink, powder blue and more.
For special occasion or mother-of-the-bride, the line comes in crepes, satins, lace and knits.
Items are sizes 2 to 14, with a wholesale range of $110 to $350.

Victor Costa For Nahdree
Michelle Harrison & Associates, 10S119
Nahdree Inc., New York, introduces Victor Costa for Nahdree, a special occasion, after-five and couture line at bridge prices.
European, Asian and American crepe, chiffon, printed silk and georgettes are combined with novelty fabrics such as brocade, cloque and matelesse.
Looks range from simple cocktail suits to elaborate ballgowns in seasonal colors, designed by Dallas’ Victor Costa.
Sizes run from 4 to 16; some styles come in 14W to 24W. Victor Costa for Nahdree wholesales for $175 to $325.

Constance Saunders By Nahdree
Michelle Harrison & Associates, 10S119
Constance Saunders, a casual ready-to-wear line by Nahdree Inc., makes its Atlanta debut this October.
Tunics with pants, dresses and jackets; pants, and skirt suits are designed in four looks: soft tailoring, embroidery on sheers, day-to-dinner and prints, including florals and two-tones.
Color schemes range from vivid brights to neutrals and clear pastels.
Domestic, Japanese and European fabrics include silks, chiffons, rayons, crepes and novelty fabrics with textured surfaces, such as nubby-finish rayon.
Wholesale prices are $105 to $220, in sizes 4 to 18.

Peak Evenings
Michelle Harrison & Associates, 10S119
Peak Evenings, a prom line by Starlink Development Ltd., New York, started in 1993, but is new to Atlanta.
Silhouettes include gowns with straight and full, flared skirts. Details include beaded bodices and trims, high collars, cutouts and spaghetti straps. For spring, the biggest news is gowns with back interest.
The fabrics, imported from China, are polyester faille, triacetate, crepe, chiffons and georgettes, in pastels and bright citrus colors for spring.
Produced in sizes 2 to 24, the line wholesales for $99 to $299.

JS Collections
Michelle Harrison & Associates, 10S119
The four-year-old JS Collection, a division of JS Group, New York, is designed for better special occasion wear.
With long and short gowns, cocktail dresses and dinner suits, the line has a muted pastel palette for spring.
Novelty fabrics, such as jacquards and brocades with metallic threads, are used with matte jersey, bias-cut silk burnouts, printed satins and chiffons.
In misses’, petite and plus sizes for the more upscale customer age 24 to 60, the line wholesales for $79 to $175.

Charlotte Tarantola
Ward & Ward, 11W125
Charlotte Tarantola, Santa Monica, Calif., is a better contemporary knitwear line that was launched in July 1995.
It is primarily a collection of novelty tops. Fine-gauge sweaters and cut-and-sew knits include heavyweight Lycra spandex fleece, pointelle and heavyweight interlocks.
Sweater details include embroidery, beading and studs. Velvet trims, lace applications, rhinestones and novelty zippers are also big.
Charlotte Tarantola also does novelty T-shirts that are flocked — by a print transfer method — embroidered or tie-dyed. Fabrics are all cotton.
Produced in sizes S, M, L, the cut-and-sew line is $18 to $45 and sweaters are $28 to $65 wholesale.

Content
Leib Associates, 11W122
Content, New York, a year-old better contemporary sportswear line, includes bias-cut and knee-length skirts, pants, tops, jackets and dresses in knits and structured styles.
Eileen Weber, vice president of sales, describes the customer as “30 to 50 years old with an income of $30,000-plus, who wants a modified sexy look with designer appeal at affordable prices.”
The line includes related separates for day into evening and some special occasion dressing, in European yarns knitted on the premises of this vertical company. Rayon, hand crochet, georgette, burnout lace and matte jersey are also used.
The line had been worn by Amanda and Sydney of “Melrose Place,” said Weber.
Items are produced in sizes 2-12 in structured styles and in P, S, M, L in knits. The wholesale range is $15 to $130.

Quickreflex
Ward & Ward, 11W125
The Toronto-based contemporary knitwear line includes item-related separates, suitings and sweaters. Textured treatments, pull-on pants and three-quarter sleeves are key features for spring.
The line is sourced and produced in Hong Kong and Canada, in include cotton and rayon and linen blends.
“Quickreflex is a 40 percent office wear and 60 percent weekend wear for our 18-to-65-year-old customer,” says Sharon Hotton, owner.
Produced in sizes 4-14, the line wholesales for $25 to $60.

Kay Unger
Don Overcast & Associates, 10E112
Kay Unger, a division of Thoebe Co., New York, began in 1994 with bridge-priced day-into-special occasion wear.
The division includes day dresses, evening dresses and evening sportswear in silks, satin silks, novelty European fabrics such as brocades, crinkle silk and iridescent fabrics.
The line is sized 2-18 and wholesales for $100 to $300.

Weston Wear
Ward & Ward, 11W125
This San Francisco-based contemporary knitwear line features slipdresses, camisoles, skirts, T-shirts, bodysuits and pants for the body-conscious customer.
Spring colors are muted pastels in cut-and-sew knits and synthetic fibers such as nylons and rayons.
The line is sized S, M, L and wholesales for $14 to $68.

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