JH COLLECTIBLES SHIFTS EXECS; BRUCE ROSS NAMED CHAIRMAN

NEW YORK — Bruce Ross has been named chairman of JH Collectibles and president and chief executive officer of Ross Enterprises Inc., the holding company for the $150 million sportswear firm.
Ross’s appointments are part of a management restructuring following the death Nov. 9 of Kenneth Ross, who was chairman and ceo of JH Collectibles.
Normand Neal, who had been executive vice president and chief operating officer of JH Collectibles, is now president and ceo.
Bruce Ross, 37, is Kenneth Ross’s son and had been president of JH Collectibles. In his new posts, Ross assumes some of the responsibilities held by his father. As part of his duties, Ross will oversee the Ross family real estate ventures that are part of Ross Enterprises, which includes various other ventures and capital investments. He will continue on the JH Collectibles board.
Neal, 43, joined the firm in April 1988 as vice president of sales for the Midwest region and in June 1990 became executive vice president and national sales manager. In January 1993, he was named chief operating officer.
He now assumes total responsibility for the JH Collectibles business and will report to its board.
The firm also said that William Feldstein Jr., 55, has come on board as special adviser and a new director. Feldstein is the son of William Feldstein Sr., founder of Junior House, the junior apparel company from which JH Collectibles was developed.
Feldstein is also the brother of Kenneth Ross’s wife, Audrey. For the past 28 years, he has been president and ceo of International Fashions, an import company dealing in the Pacific Rim, contracting knitwear and apparel, and will continue with that company.
“We were talking about the need for restructuring three years ago, when Ken Ross suffered another heart attack,” said Neal, who noted the restructuring follows Kenneth Ross’s plan. “Ken became more vocal about it three months ago, as he became more critically ill. He wanted the company to be able to go forward and to see the company perpetuate.”

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