CREATIVITY SHINES AT FIT STUDENT SHOW

Byline: Melanie Kletter

NEW YORK — Judging by the range of creative looks shown at the recent Fashion Institute of Technology spring 2000 fashion show, the next generation of fashion designers has a diverse view of what people should wear.
The energetic show covered an eclectic mix of fashions from over-the-top streetwear to classic, tailored designs inspired by the looks of Yves Saint Laurent.
Key themes were deconstructed, cut-out and asymmetrical styles, leather looks ranging from bustiers to red leather coats, and brightly colored sportswear and ready-to-wear. Other trends were reversible items and zipper trims, which were shown on skirts, shirts and outerwear.
The show, held at FIT’s Haft Auditorium, showcased designs from graduates in the Fashion Design department. Held twice a year, the exhibition featured designs in eight categories, including sportswear, knitwear, eveningwear and intimate apparel.
Each category was judged by a critic from the fashion industry, and an award went to the outstanding student in each category. Among the critics were Susan Lazar, George Samen, Elliot Staples, and Isabel and Ruben Toledo.
Winners of the event were Allison Miller-Bazzichelli and Liz Pineda for current scene I and II, Allison Levin for sportswear, Emily Farstad for children’s wear, Sally Tseng for intimate apparel, Andre E. Roberge for knitwear, Viviana Barraza and Katharina Bjorneboe for contemporary tailored design I and II, and Abigail Dalquist for eveningwear.
“This is all I have ever wanted to do,” Dalquist said at a reception following the show. “It was a lot of work, and there were so many pieces that were wonderful, so I am really happy to have won.”
George Simonton, the suitmaker who also is an instructor in tailored design, had his class pay homage to Saint Laurent, with students researching the designer’s looks over the past several decades and offering modern interpretations.
“This was a wonderful tribute to Laurent,” Simonton said. “The students really came through and offered looks that were young, sexy and modern.”