A vintage style by Amato.

Carolina Amato, the glove and shawl company, is celebrating its 30th anniversary in business.<BR><BR>The Long Island-born designer may not be a household name, but her gloves and shawls are a mainstay for department stores like Neiman Marcus and...

Carolina Amato, the glove and shawl company, is celebrating its 30th anniversary in business.

The Long Island-born designer may not be a household name, but her gloves and shawls are a mainstay for department stores like Neiman Marcus and specialty stores like Henri Bendel.

Her styles range from popcorn-knit crocheted cashmere gloves in colors like pink and teal to elbow-length fine-knit cashmere gloves with a leather gauntlet in a corresponding color like hunter green or midnight blue, for a dressy winter evening.

Bridal accessories are a significant part of Amato’s business, with 1,500 wholesale accounts including specialty and smaller independent boutiques. The company offers a full range of silk and satin gloves in a large array of combinations, with crystal detailing and ribbon accoutrements.

“Bridal worked out for me,” she said. “At the time I started doing bridal gloves, bare, elegant, unembellished dresses came into the market, and so everyone needed gloves.”

The designer started in the fashion industry in the early Seventies designing costume jewelry. “Everyone was doing fashion jewelry back then,” said Amato. “Then a well-respected buyer came up to my showroom and told me, ‘Hey, no one is doing good gloves.’ So I decided to do gloves, and it grew from there.”

The designer now is influenced by her 18- and 21-year-old daughters, Lorianna and Francesca.

“They are always digging around in my archives and love the old styles that I did in the Seventies,” said Amato.

In honor of her trifecta of three decades, Amato is reintroducing vintage styles from her archive, including a short, popcorn-knit glove with two crocheted pom-poms at the end; a knit glove with an openwork gauntlet that slides over, and a ruched midlength cashmere blend style with fur trim at the top.

The company’s sales hit $5 million in 2004, according to Amato.

This story first appeared in the May 23, 2005 issue of WWD. Subscribe Today.

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