NEW YORK — Brands getting behind young designers is nothing new, but when Cartier decided to support Zac Posen, he went a step further.

While Cartier has printed the invitations for Posen’s show and is hosting the after-party, the designer has named his latest collection after Cartier’s new Trinity jewelry line and has even produced a few looks inspired by the jewelry. He also will debut Cartier’s new baubles on his runway.

Posen met Cartier’s North American president and chief executive officer, Stanislas de Quercize, in May when Cartier named him a modern pioneer and awarded him a Santos 100 watch. The two clicked immediately, and the friendship paved the way for this collaboration.

“[Jean] Cocteau designed the Trinity ring, and I have always been a fan,” Posen said. “I adore the way that they combine architecture, femininity and humor in their designs. It echoes my own philosophy.”

He added that his Trinity collection is “about the idea of movement and continuous lines, and the tripartite nature of Cartier’s Trinity jewelry is powerful.”

Cartier’s Trinity is based on the original iconic design of three linked rings in yellow, white and rose gold — but the new collection updates the concept and interprets it into necklaces, bracelets and rings, such as the Sweet Trinity drop earrings, which feature yellow, white and rose gold spheres, for $2,100 at retail.

“In this new collection, there is a Trinity design for everyone,” de Quercize said. “You can now have rings, bracelets, necklaces — whereas at the beginning, it was only rings.”

In the past few seasons, Cartier teamed up with designers such as Jeffrey Chow and J. Mendel. On Friday, it will host Posen’s after-show party at its Fifth Avenue mansion.

Besides Posen’s runway show, the Trinity jewelry launch will be supported by a marketing campaign that includes up to 80 posters in Grand Central Terminal Oct.4-31.

— Marc Karimzadeh

This story first appeared in the September 7, 2004 issue of WWD. Subscribe Today.

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