DuraColour Nail Strips

NEW YORK — Now there is a nail polish that doesn’t spill and requires no drying time.<br><br>Nailene, the maker of artificial nails and nail treatments, will break into the polish category in March with the introduction of DuraColour Nail...

NEW YORK — Now there is a nail polish that doesn’t spill and requires no drying time.

This story first appeared in the January 30, 2004 issue of WWD. Subscribe Today.

Nailene, the maker of artificial nails and nail treatments, will break into the polish category in March with the introduction of DuraColour Nail Strips.

Deemed a nail polish alternative, the strips which come in nine different shades and designs, can be used on fingernails or toenails. Under ideal conditions, the strips can last up to 7 days for fingers and 10 days for toes.

Each kit, priced $3.99, contains 36 strips to fit a range of nail sizes, a mini file and two cleansing towelettes. To use the color strips, first treat the nail with the cleansing cloth, then apply the strip beginning at the base of the nail, curve it around the tip and then file off the excess. To remove, simply peel it off. Any residue can be washed off with soap and water. According to Nailene, the nail strips provide “no chip color” and prevent nail yellowing.

Designs include solid colors with simple patterns like a hibiscus flower. There is also a patriotic red, white and blue look.

“We are always looking for innovative new products and treatments and other nail items related to the category,” said Janine Coppola, marketing manager for Nailene, explaining the firm’s entry into the color segment.

At most retailers, DuraColour will be displayed with nail polishes as opposed to artificial nail kits. CVS, Rite Aid, Walgreens and Sav-On are among the chains that will be carrying DuraColour. The company projects first year retail sales in the U.S., Canada and Europe could reach $5 million.