A Pringle look from fall 2005.

LONDON — Stuart Stockdale, the English designer who has helped relaunch the fashion and knitwear brand Pringle of Scotland, will leave the company later this month once he's completed the spring 2006 collection.<BR><BR>Pringle will make an...

LONDON — Stuart Stockdale, the English designer who has helped relaunch the fashion and knitwear brand Pringle of Scotland, will leave the company later this month once he’s completed the spring 2006 collection.

Pringle will make an official announcement today.

Stockdale, who has been head of design since 2001, is leaving to pursue another creative project. Pringle said it planned to announce a replacement soon.

“In four years, he’s taken Pringle from a rail of knitwear to a full luxury collection, with over 50 percent growth in Europe and the U.K.,” said Kim Winser, Pringle’s chief executive officer. “He’s helped us to do a fantastic job.”

Stockdale, 36, declined to comment on his future plans.

Stockdale said his biggest achievement at Pringle was mixing history and heritage with fashion. “I had to delve into the history of this company” and then make it modern and give it a soul of its own,” he said.

Since Stockdale’s arrival, Pringle has established itself in the U.K., European and Asian markets and is now launching in the U.S. and Russia. Stockdale made his mark on the brand early, juggling the heritage of the brand with a contemporary take on the collections.

He updated and reintroduced vintage styles from Pringle’s archives, paired Pringle’s signature wool and cashmere with fabrics such as devore silks and tweeds, and updated the signature argyle print for tops, dresses and coats.

Pringle of Scotland is celebrating its 190th anniversary this year. Founded in 1815 by Robert Pringle, the company began as a manufacturer of hosiery and underwear, and developed as one of the first luxury knitwear manufacturers in the world. In March 2000, the Hong Kong-based S.C. Fang & Sons purchased the company, and set about relaunching the brand.

This story first appeared in the May 11, 2005 issue of WWD. Subscribe Today.

load comments
blog comments powered by Disqus