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NEW YORK — For 2004, Guerlain has a whole new attitude for its venerable Shalimar fragrance. <BR><BR>The brand, which will introduce a flanker to the original scent in March, is taking the opportunity to put forth three new faces for the...

NEW YORK — For 2004, Guerlain has a whole new attitude for its venerable Shalimar fragrance.

The brand, which will introduce a flanker to the original scent in March, is taking the opportunity to put forth three new faces for the fragrance: model Patti Hansen and her daughters, Theodora and Alexandra Richards.

“For our U.S. business, 2004 is a year that we will be focusing on fragrance — both putting forth the new Guerlain and putting a new emphasis on a classic,” noted Renato Semerari, worldwide chief executive officer of Guerlain. “We wanted to go forward with a big bang in the U.S., and the nature of our brand has always been to build strong classics.”

The renewed focus on Shalimar started about 18 months ago, noted Camille McDonald, president and ceo of Guerlain and Givenchy in the U.S. “Shalimar is a powerful icon in the U.S., and we wanted to reinterpret it for a new generation,” said McDonald. “We chose to do that in two ways: by creating a new ad campaign that celebrates generations, and by releasing a flanker scent, Shalimar Light, that is intended to draw new users to the brand — especially those 25 to 35 years old — as well as entice existing consumers. In fact, Shalimar Light will capitalize on the biggest strength of Shalimar: the customer’s relationship to the scent as a fragrance that gets passed on from one generation to another.”

Shalimar Light was created by Jean-Paul Guerlain, whose grandfather, Jacques Guerlain, created the classic juice in 1925. The classic Shalimar is a soft oriental, with top notes of bergamot and citrus; a middle note of jasmine flower, and a drydown of dark vanilla, woods and spices. Shalimar Light, a fresh, floral amber, has top notes of high tech bergamot (intended to be “transparent and luminous,” said McDonald); a middle note of jasmine petals, and a drydown of luminous vanilla. Packaging for Shalimar Light is slightly modified from the traditional Shalimar eau de toilette bottle. The traditional bottle is clear glass with a cap of solid blue, while Shalimar Light’s glass bottle is edged in blue and topped with a translucent blue cap.

This story first appeared in the January 9, 2004 issue of WWD. Subscribe Today.

Shalimar Light, which will be a permanent addition to the brand, will be available in two eau de toilette sizes: 1.7 oz. for $50 and 2.5 oz. for $60, as well as a 6.8-oz. body lotion for $45 and a 6.8-oz. shower gel for $40. Both fragrances will be available in about 2,000 U.S. department and specialty store doors in early March.

The ad campaign, with the tag line “a new generation rocks a classic,” breaks in April fashion, beauty and lifestyle magazines, including In Style, Vogue, Cosmopolitan and Lucky. It was photographed by Regan Cameron, and its art directors were Giovanni Russo of No. 11 and Tho Van Tran of Air Agency. The ad is for the U.S. market only.

“The dual generations of Patti Hansen with her daughters mirror the two Shalimars — bridging generations who have the same love of classic and contemporary, style and quality, innovation and permanence,” said McDonald. The ad targets two demographics, and communicates the brand values of elegance, style, love and intense emotion, as well as a rock ’n’ roll lifestyle that conveys luxury, opulence and contemporary style.” The last Shalimar ad campaign was created in 2000.

Sources estimate that the new Shalimar juice, combined with the original, will do upward of $20 million at retail in the U.S. in 2004, and that the brand will spend upward of $2 million in the 2004 calendar year on the print ad campaign.