The designers, center, and the women of WAR.

NEW YORK — Shoppers and do-gooders were on hand last week at the White + Warren showroom here to raise funds for breast cancer research. The shopping event and cocktail party marked the fourth anniversary of White + Warren’s partnership...

NEW YORK — Shoppers and do-gooders were on hand last week at the White + Warren showroom here to raise funds for breast cancer research. The shopping event and cocktail party marked the fourth anniversary of White + Warren’s partnership with Women at Risk, or WAR, an organization dedicated to breast cancer research and awareness.

“A few years ago, we called them and said, ‘What can we do?’” said Barbara Warren, co-founder of the knitwear label. For the past four years, White + Warren has created selected items sold exclusively on its Web site for the month of October, breast cancer awareness month. Fifty percent of the proceeds benefit WAR and its efforts to fight breast cancer. This year, White + Warren designed pink cashmere sweaters and a pink bouclé scarf. The designers even painted the showroom pink to mark the event.

Bonnie Pressman, senior vice president of women’s accessories at Polo Ralph Lauren, was on hand to lend her support. “I’m a breast cancer survivor. I was one of the lucky ones,” she said as her purchases were being rung up at the event, which took place last Tuesday night.

Kitty Silverman, executive director of WAR, said White + Warren shares the mission of the organization. “After all,” she said, “our audiences are very similar.” In the first three years, White + Warren has raised $30,000 for the organization. This year it expects to double that figure.

“The great thing about White + Warren is that they’re not only there in October, but all year long,” said Freya Schnabel, medical director at WAR, who went on to explain the medical achievements the group has made. “We’re already making better advancements in chemotherapy,” she said. “For the future, we need to begin looking at healthy women who don’t have cancer yet so we can intervene and see where and how it starts. The goal is to stop the runaway train before it starts.”

— Lauren DeCarlo

This story first appeared in the October 21, 2004 issue of WWD. Subscribe Today.

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