Giorgio Armani.

MILANGiorgio Armani will host the “Vite Straordinarie,” or “Extraordinary Lives” in English, film series at his Armani/Silos space.

Beginning June 13, six biopics focusing on the lives of key personalities in the world of cinema, photography and music will be screened at the venue with the goal to investigate the psychology of their creativity.

“This series is all about the many faces of creativity,” said the designer in a statement. “The biopic is a fascinating way to gain insight into the lives of people that we may only know through their work, and can give a clue as to how these people create.”

The films on show include “Finding Vivian Maier,” directed by John Maloof and Charlie Siskel in 2013 and focusing on nanny and photographer Vivian Maier; “Let’s Get Lost,” directed by Bruce Weber in 1988 and narrating the story of legendary jazz musician Chet Baker; “The Art Life,” a 2016 film retracing the formative years of director David Lynch; “The Salt of the Earth,” directed by Wim Wenders and Juliano Ribeiro Salgado in 2014 and investigating the work of Brazilian photographer Sebastião Salgado; “A Letter to Elia,” directed by Martin Scorsese and Kent Jones in 2010 and exploring the life and career of film director Elia Kazan, and “Listen to Me Marlon,” a documentary film about movie icon Marlon Brando.

“Cinema is for me still a constant source of inspiration, and by exploring different genres I unlock new ideas,” said Armani about his special relationship with the world of filmmaking.

Over the years, the designer has created the costumes for a range of movies, from, most famously, “American Gigolo” in 1980, creating a wardrobe for Richard Gere, to “The Untouchables,” “Gattaca,” “Stealing Beauty,” “Shaft,” the “Batman series,” “The Tuxedo,” “De-Lovely,” “Ocean’s Thirteen,” “Fair Game,” ” The Social Network,” “Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol,” “A Most Violent Year” and “The Wolf of Wall Street,” to name a few.

The Silos space was unveiled in April 2015.

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