The flowers were growing by the hour on Tuesday, March 23, 2021. They were left by multitudes of mourners for the 10 people killed at the Boulder King Soopers in Boulder, Colo. on Monday. (Jerilee Bennett/The Gazette via AP)

Lynn Murray, a former photo director at Hearst Publications and Condé Nast, was among the victims in Monday’s shooting at the King Soopers grocery store in Boulder, Colo.

Murray was among the 10 people who lost their lives at the hands of 21-year-old Ahmad Al Aliwi Alissa, who is charged with 10 counts of first-degree murder. The victims ranged in age from 20 to 65.

The 62-year-old Murray was inside at the time of the shooting, reportedly on a food delivery run for grocery service Instacart. Family friend Hope Cotten described running into Murray in the store and told “CBS This Morning”: “She was smiling. We were laughing, just talking about cauliflower and whatever else.[…]‘This is good work — quick 50 bucks,’ [Murray said].”

Funeral plans were not immediately known.

The Boulder police department invited the public to join officers in a tribute Wednesday afternoon for fallen police officer Eric Talley, a father of seven children, who was among the victims. Members of the Boulder police department lined the streets and lined up their vehicles outside of the Boulder coroner’s office before the police escort of his body to a funeral home in Aurora.

Gov. Jared Polis, the city of Boulder and the NHL’s Colorado Avalanche, also paid tribute to the victims.

Murray’s relatives were not available to comment Wednesday.

Fashion illustrator Donald Robertson, former Glamour magazine editor in chief Cindi Leive and Hollywood Life’s editor in chief Bonnie Fuller were among the members of the fashion crowd who mourned Murray’s loss via social media. Fuller recalled meeting Murray in the 1990s, when she was building a team to create the U.S. premiere issue of Marie Claire, which launched in the fall of 1994. “She contributed enormously to the magazine’s success. She kept working with me. When I moved over to Cosmo, she moved over, too. And I hired her also at Glamour magazine.”

Fuller and Murray continued to work together until 2001. Describing Murray as friendly and energetic, Fuller said, “She just got in there and got the job done. But she was really warm and emphatic as a human being. You could talk to her about anything. She was a very friendly, caring and open person. And she was a determined person. When she set out to do something, she did it.”

Family-oriented, Murray liked to spend off-hours with her husband and two children. The couple left New York City for Long Island after the birth of their first child. They liked to hit the beach, including for town-organized concerts there. Murray also enjoyed decorating and cooking.

Fuller said, “She made big contributions to the fashion industry. She helped us to create wonderful covers and photo shoots. Marie Claire was really considered groundbreaking, when we launched it [due to] a lot of the new features that we had, photo shoots and the approach to fashion. Lynn was very much a part of creating all that. She played a big role in the fashion world.”

Having worked with Murray during her Condé Nast days, Kate Lewis, who is now Hearst’s chief content officer, sent a note to her team that said of Murray, “She was a talented, creative colleague and friend and mentor to many. My heart aches for her husband and two children, and for the families of all the victims of this horrible act of violence.”

Murray grew up in Mentor, Ohio. After graduating from Mentor High School in the class of 1977, she attended Ohio University. Murray lived in Ohio, New York, Florida and Colorado through the years after exiting Manhattan’s media scene.

After working in New York’s media world at what were relatively high-flying days for many fashion magazines, Murray entered semiretirement. She reportedly took to the gig economy, working for Instacart, Uber and Lyft.

In addition to her husband John Mackenzie, Murray is survived by her daughter Olivia Mackenzie and her son Pierce.

The shooting prompted Vice President Kamala Harris, Colorado legislators and gun control advocates to speak out about the need for tighter gun restrictions. There have been numerous shootings in Colorado since the 1999 Columbine High School shooting that left 15 individuals dead. Monday’s suspected gunman was said to have carried an AR-15-type rifle that had reportedly been purchased days earlier.

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