Britt Robertson and Sophia Amoruso at the "Girlboss" TV show premiere

PARTING WAYS: The much buzzed about “Girlboss” Netflix series starring Britt Robertson and chronicling the rise of Nasty Gal has been canceled after its first season.

The news was revealed on Instagram Stories where Nasty Gal founder and former chief executive Sophia Amoruso herself disclosed the news to followers.

The show aimed to capture Amoruso just before she founded the Los Angeles-based e-tailer as well chronicle its rise. The show debuted in April and was written by Kay Cannon, whose credits include “30 Rock” and “New Girl,” with Charlize Theron serving as executive producer.

Amoruso later posted another message on Instagram Stories, countering an article that implied she had criticized her own show with the announcement when she expressed the opportunity to be had in moving forward to tell her own story.

“I absolutely loved the show and am so sad it’s over,” she wrote. “I am grateful for it all. But how a website can conflate ‘throwing shade’ with saying that a woman is excited to own her narrative after bankruptcy headlines, false lawsuits and a dramatized series is created (which I will repeat: I loved and am proud of) is bonkers….”

In real life, Amoruso paved the way for many born-online brands with a social media savvy that allowed its rapid rise. However, it was its own growth that ultimately hampered the business and Nasty Gal was most recently sold out of bankruptcy to Manchester-based Boohoo.com plc for $20 million in February.

Amoruso since then has focused on the buildout of her Girlboss brand, which includes her debut book “#Girlboss” and the more recent “Nasty Galaxy.” In March her Girlboss digital media company hosted its first-ever conference, which drew about 500 to the sold-out event. Amoruso said at that time she had turned a corner and was starting anew.

“Every decision that you make becomes something you live out for the next year or years or decade,” she told WWD at that time when talking about starting over. “In the beginning you’re not burdened by the legacy of your technology or [a] department. Whatever you created you’re really in a place [of] pure invention in a way and that’s the best part.”

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