Palace Skateboards Teams With Juventus Soccer Team

Juventus' players sported uniforms branded by Palace during a match against Genoa on Wednesday night.

ON THE FIELDS: In an unexpected move, Wednesday’s night soccer match between the Turin-based Juventus team and Genoa turned out to be a fashion affair.

Juventus’ players, including Cristiano Ronaldo, took the audience by surprise appearing ahead of and during the match sporting a training uniform and new jerseys, both branded by London-based streetwear firm Palace Skateboards, in addition to Adidas’ three-stripe logo. The German sportswear giant has served as Juventus’ partner since 2015.

The Palace Juventus kit includes predominantly white items such as a tracksuit, a T-shirt, a training uniform, as well as a scarf and hat in addition to the soccer club’s jerseys. The lineup is peppered with neon green and orange details.

A release date for the collection has yet to be announced.

“It’s a great fusion between soccer and fashion to further widen our borders,” said Giorgio Ricci, Juventus chief revenue officer. “We wanted to make a surprise by appearing on the soccer field with a jersey that stems from the collaboration with an iconic and world-renowned skater brand,” he added.

Despite marking the first time Palace is partnering with a soccer team, the British skate firm has previously linked with Adidas to create a court-ready lineup called Adidas tennis by Palace collection, which made its debut last year.

Over the years Palace has collaborated with Polo Ralph Lauren and Umbro, widening its appeal beyond the skater world and attracting thousands of fans to weekly product drops at its four stores, in London, New York, Los Angeles and Tokyo.

The collaboration comes a year after Paris Saint-Germain teamed up with Nike Inc.-owned Jordan Brand on a collection.

Earlier this year, WWD reported Palace was said to have held under-the-radar discussions to sell a stake.

Founded in 2009 by Levent Tanju and his crew of skaters, Palace initially sold decks and clothes with its triangular logo in London skate shops, eventually gaining traction among high-end retailers, including End Clothing, Maxfield and Dover Street Market.