Macy’s celebrated the Rachel Rachel Roy spring collection along with the designer’s Self Rule platform at its Westfield Fashion Square store in Sherman Oaks, Calif., on Thursday night.

The designer, along with actresses Ashley Rickards and Lindsey Morgan, met with five young women chosen by the charity Covenant House California to receive makeovers from RRR and Bobbi Brown. In addition, 20 percent of the evening’s purchases were donated to Covenant House, along with $10 for every Post-It containing an inspirational message that customers placed on the Self Rule wall.

“There’s nothing I like more than having strong women around me. Self Rule came about with the design process. We were just going to put a graphic T-shirt into the collection and then we realized it could be something more,” Roy said of the $39 Self Rule t-shirt, whose proceeds benefit the Step Up Women’s Network. It’s an exercise that she tries to apply to her own business.

“As I look for new licensees and work with my new partners to expand, I’m trying to figure out different ways from the old model, because if I’ve had any success at all, it’s when things don’t go well and then I’m forced to think outside of the box. So why not encourage young women to think differently?”

Roy, who launched the “Kindness is Always Fashionable” campaign with her signature line, devised Self Rule to empower young women and boost opportunities for sustainable employment. Via Instagram, she has posted 30 inspirational quotes in 30 days to promote the platform. That caused Morgan, who follows Roy on the social network, to reach out to see how she could get involved.

“I love that Rachel relates to every woman and what she stands for. It turned out that she was having this event so it worked out perfectly,” said Morgan, who plays mechanical engineer Raven Reyes on the CW show “The 100.” “I was mentored in high school through the National Hispanic Institute and I did the same for girls when I got older. I want to find more ways to connect and have a positive impact because I have the ability to do that with my job.”

Rickards, who penned a Harlequin book last month called “A Real Guide to Really Getting it Together,” shares the ethos. “It’s very important to be proactive and go from the ground up. It’s something I relate to, working as hard as I have to act and direct. I came to Los Angeles and didn’t know anyone. It’s hard to be confident so it’s important to give young people the tools to do that.”

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