Jamie AndersonSnowboard - PyeongChang 2018 Olympic Games, Bongpyeong-Myeon, Korea - 12 Feb 2018Gold medal winner Jamie Anderson of the USA celebrates her win on the podium with the US flag after the Women's Snowboard Slopestyle Final Run at the Bokwang Phoenix Park during the PyeongChang 2018 Olympic Games, South Korea, 12 February 2018.

COMPLETE SNOW JOBS: Internationally renowned athletes can really break the bank, as Floyd Mayweather can attest with $275 million in salary/winnings and $10 million in endorsements.

The quick-footed fighter tops the 2018 Forbes List of The World’s Highest Paid Athletes with Argentina’s leading soccer player Lionel Messi ranking second with $84 million and $27 million in endorsements.

With a reported $4 million in estimated earnings from sponsors like Burton and Beats by Dre, three-time Olympic gold medalist Shaun White was the highest-paid male athlete at this year’s Winter Games in PyeongChang. But the sponsored life is more of a challenge for unproven mountain athletes like ski racers, snowboarding and ski jumping even at the elite level. Snowboarder Jamie Anderson, who won two gold medals last winter, personally started pitching potential sponsors at the age of 10. Olympian Brian Fletcher worked part-time in a restaurant, snowboarder Jonathan Cheever punched the clock as a plumber and Ryan Cochran-Siegle worked at his family’s store to help get to this year’s Winter Games. To try to help offset athlete’s expenses — which extend beyond apparel and equipment — the Colorado-based brand Sync Performance has launched its Elevate the Athlete project. Shoppers can direct 10 percent of their purchases to partners that support teams, clubs and groups with personalized products. Consumers, who buy items on the sites for Sync Performance and Sync Custom Program will have that option during the checkout process. They will also be able to stay up-to-date on the progress as a result of their respective contributions to such groups as High Fives Foundation, T2 Foundation and the Ski and Snowboard Club Vail.

Team America, the University of Denver Ski Team and the Stratton Mountain School are some of the organizations that Sync has partnered with in the past.

Chief innovation officer Geof Ochs said, “This project is all about the athlete. Whether you are an individual competitor or a like-minded organization, our aim is to make an impact on the successes of mountain athletes. We will do so by raising awareness in their communities and raising funds for their pursuits, all while giving Sync customers the opportunity to take part in the movement by choosing which partners they support.”

Sync relies on mountain athletes to wear-test its products and offer their insights regarding design. The company is also accepting applications for up-and-coming mountain athletes in need of Sync’s support. On another front, the company offers discounts to professionals including USSA/FIS racers, coaches, teams/clubs, military, professional outdoor athletes, professional ski patrollers and PSIA instructors.

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