Cozyland

Morgan Lane is getting cozy. 

The luxury sleepwear brand is launching a new, sister brand today called Cozyland. The gender-neutral lounge and sleepwear collection includes adult and child sizes, all made from sustainable fabrics. Items include T-shirts, sweats, hoodies and more casual loungewear than what would normally be found at Morgan Lane. 

Cozyland

Cozyland includes lounge and sleepwear options for men, women, children and babies.  Courtesy Photo Alexander Caesar Estrada

“Morgan Lane is kind of like the fancier sister and Cozyland is the funkier, cute younger sister,” Morgan Curtis, founder and designer of both brands, told WWD. “I would say they complement each other. They still share the same family values. They just definitely have a different style and use of materials. 

“The most important difference is that Cozyland is an eco-friendly brand,” Curtis continued. “It uses organic cotton from Peru. We have made really cloud-soft products that you can wash easily and it lasts for a really long time. The Pima cotton kind of grows with your baby, a little bit. So, it’s very different than the silk found in Morgan Lane.”

Curtis said Cozyland’s sustainability efforts include the packaging, which is made from 100 percent recyclable materials, including naturally made dyes. In addition, Cozyland manufactures its products in factories that are certified by the Global Organic Textile Standard, a global textile processing standard that determines if parts of the supply chain follow fair trade and working standards.  

“That is definitely one of the most important things about the brand,” she said. 

Cozyland

Cozyland includes matching coordinated outfits for couples and families.  Courtesy Photo Alexander Caesar Estrada

Curtis said she was inspired to create Cozyland after having her own child. Suddenly, what she put on her daughter’s body became a priority. But also, as a designer, she noticed a lot of the same styles in the children’s market. 

“It was, kind of like, that Scandinavian look. I was just seeing it everywhere,” said Curtis, referring to a muted color scheme, consisting of mostly beige and white. “I wanted to make a brand that used really fun colors, just made you feel good and just took inspiration from the rainbow and the sky and desserts that I love to eat, and dreams, and just made you want to snuggle up. So I kind of thought of Cozyland while I was hanging out with my daughter.”

The result is a collection made with lavender pink and bright blue fabrics, many with custom prints, such as astrological stars or elephant patterns, all illustrated by the designer. Cozyland will also incorporate Curtis’ signature use of lettering and embroidery to help further personalize each piece. 

Cozyland

Cozyland includes many of designer Morgan Curtis’ trademark features, such as special stitching.  Courtesy Photo Alexander Caesar Estrada

“You’ll see lots of special tags and embroideries and stitching in Cozyland, but with different fonts and different shapes and different placements than Morgan Lane,” she explained. 

The collection is intended for a slightly younger shopper than those at Morgan Lane (18 to 35 years old, compared with Morgan Lane’s 25 to 44 years old demographic.) It also has a larger percentage of pieces made for babies and children (58 percent) than for adults. Still more coordinated matching looks for both couples and whole families will be another focal point for the brand. 

“So you can match your baby,” Curtis said. “But we’re doing it in a more creative way. The matching sets are not exactly the same [like other brands]. They kind of just coordinate with each other. Maybe they use the same print, but they’re a different body. Or they are the same color, but they’re different styles.”

Curtis said matching attire is something shoppers have been asking for — so is more loungewear, despite the slowing down of the pandemic and many consumers to return to the office. She said sales of sleepwear have actually increased in the last three months. 

“I don’t think consumers are getting rid of any of their sweats completely or their jammies,” Curtis said. “I think people got a taste of what it’s like to be home with their kids and feel comfortable and be able to work in comfortable clothing. And I really don’t think that’s ever going to change, now that they know what that’s like.” 

Cozyland

Cozyland can be worn as both sleepwear and ready-to-wear apparelCourtesy Photo Alexander Caesar Estrada

That’s evident in Morgan Lane’s revenues, which are up 20 percent, year-to-date, or the period between January 2021 and June 2021, compared with the same time in 2020. Consumers are still seeking out comfortable options, Curtis said, such as organic tops. 

“That tells us that our customer is definitely looking for some eco-friendly solutions,” she said, adding that “Cozyland is kind of going to double as a ready-to-wear contemporary brand and a sleepwear brand. Same theory as Morgan Lane: that you can wear the pieces, the pajamas and the sweats and everything, from day to night.” 

The company will also continue to do collaborations within the Cozyland brand, such as the ones Morgan Lane did with model, DJ and mental health advocate Atlanta de Cadenet Taylor and LoveShackFancy.

Cozyland will remain online at wearecozyland.com for now. But Curtis said she would like to do a Cozyland pop-up sometime before the end of the year. Prices range from $55 to $168 and range in size from newborn to 8 years old for babies and children and petite through XXL for adults. 

“I think that what’s really unique about this launch is that Cozyland is going to be able to capitalize on Morgan Lane’s success, but with a different product offering,” Curtis said. “So hopefully we’ll be able to grow our empire overall by offering both of these brands and just make our customers feel like they’re making an investment into something that they can wear on multiple occasions and in different ways.”