Union Knopf offered a wide assortment of buttons at the Mod’Amont trim show.

PARIS — Exuberant mixes, such as fur with embroideries or rhinestones with leather, reflected a more flamboyant approach to trimmings at the Mod’Amont show here.<BR><BR>The supplies and trim show, which featured 244 exhibitors, wrapped up...

PARIS — Exuberant mixes, such as fur with embroideries or rhinestones with leather, reflected a more flamboyant approach to trimmings at the Mod’Amont show here.

The supplies and trim show, which featured 244 exhibitors, wrapped up its four-day run Sept. 24.

“Business is finally back to what it was before” the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, which put a damper on luxury spending, said Alison Barclay, senior production manager for Eskandar, a British high-end fashion apparel line with boutiques in London and Paris that also wholesales to U.S. stores such as Neiman Marcus. “We still are careful, but when we see things we like, we don’t hesitate to buy.”

Tia Cibani, creative director for Canadian high-end women’s apparel line Ports 1961, said, “We feel very confident budget-wise.”

Cibani said Bielefeld, Germany-based Union Knopf had “great buttons” and called the offering of Capalle, Italy-based trimmings company Lineapiu “particularly beautiful.” Cibani also noticed innovative uses of hardware, such as buckles and hooks, intricate closures for jewelry and large leather buttons.

Many of the exhibitors heralded the end of a minimalist approach to trimmings and supplies.

“People want to decorate their garments with a plethora of buttons ranging in colors and sizes,” said Martin Dolleschel, president of Union Knopf. “People are looking for eye-catchers.”

Dolleschel added that large, flower-shaped leather buttons and shiny stone buttons were popular for the fall 2005-winter 2006 season.

Pamela Vettori, brand manager for Lineapiu, said buyers gravitated to glamour.

“People want to be seen this year,” she said, noting that green, rose and gold trim was in demand. “Designers are adding stylish trimmings to just about anything: Swimsuits, jewelry, bracelets and even collars for cats and dogs.”

Vettori and Dolleschel both said they were satisfied with business at the show.

Union Knopf’s Dolleschel cited strong attendance of French, Italian, English and Turkish buyers. Traffic from across the Atlantic seemed lower, he said, suggesting, “Most American buyers go to the shows in the Far East now.”

— Emilie Marsh

This story first appeared in the October 5, 2004 issue of WWD. Subscribe Today.

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