In Zac Posen’s own words, his pre-fall lineup was “a pretty diverse collection.” That was putting it mildly. There was a look for a vast breadth of occasions, whether a black-tie ball or a Sunday in church, all loosely filed under a jewel-toned, Kees van Dongen inspiration. The collection was day-to-evening in terms of the variety of options if offered rather than the transitional nature of the garments. Daywear included separates such as culottes, peplum tops and swishy tailoring, yet the standouts were the feminine dresses. Posen went big on gowns, his bread-and-butter, showing a range of sculptural silhouettes in high-drama stretch satin and tulle for which he’s best known, as well as a darling, refreshingly light cotton liberty print style. High-octane eveningwear is Posen’s biggest business driver, which might seem antithetical to the increasingly casual world in which we live. But he says it’s because of it. A designer customer today has a whole casual life before they will go into designer clothing, meaning jeans and sweatpants,” he reasoned. “It’s no longer even contemporary as much, it’s ath-leisure. So if they are going to buy an evening piece, it’s going to be special.”

By  on December 4, 2017

In Zac Posen’s own words, his pre-fall lineup was “a pretty diverse collection.” That was putting it mildly. There was a look for a vast breadth of occasions, whether a black-tie ball or a Sunday in church, all loosely filed under a jewel-toned, Kees van Dongen inspiration. The collection was day-to-evening in terms of the variety of options if offered rather than the transitional nature of the garments. Daywear included separates such as culottes, peplum tops and swishy tailoring, yet the standouts were the feminine dresses. Posen went big on gowns, his bread-and-butter, showing a range of sculptural silhouettes in high-drama stretch satin and tulle for which he’s best known, as well as a darling, refreshingly light cotton liberty print style. High-octane eveningwear is Posen’s biggest business driver, which might seem antithetical to the increasingly casual world in which we live. But he says it’s because of it. A designer customer today has a whole casual life before they will go into designer clothing, meaning jeans and sweatpants,” he reasoned. “It’s no longer even contemporary as much, it’s ath-leisure. So if they are going to buy an evening piece, it’s going to be special.”

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