Zuhair Murad’s mind went to Japan for this collection loaded with floral motifs. The designer referenced work by artist Tsuguharu Foujita in the Twenties, with his east-meets-west perspective; Poiret’s kimono silhouettes, and Araki’s photographs.

The ornate pre-fall line was divided into numerous interlocking themes, including “Hokusai scenery.” This featured what resembled watercolor landscapes in pastel hues on numerous looks, such as the obi-belted trousers ensemble and mini or floor-length dresses in silk twill.

The “vintage blossoms” section took a wabi-sabi — nothing’s perfect — approach to flowers, which were partly decayed and popping up on the likes of a long fil coupé V-neck dress with a dark background.

But the overall allure was tough in this evening-leaning collection, with the designer incorporating a lot of leather, as well as black and red color schemes.

Lending a graphic aspect were pieces featuring a tattoo and temple theme. Here, tulle was embroidered for a long, off-one-shoulder dress, giving a barely there effect. Cutout velvet embroideries appeared on stretch wool or chiffon bases in black or red — meant to be reminiscent of a Nippon sunrise — for dresses, shirts and trousers.

By  on January 23, 2019

Zuhair Murad’s mind went to Japan for this collection loaded with floral motifs. The designer referenced work by artist Tsuguharu Foujita in the Twenties, with his east-meets-west perspective; Poiret’s kimono silhouettes, and Araki’s photographs.

The ornate pre-fall line was divided into numerous interlocking themes, including “Hokusai scenery.” This featured what resembled watercolor landscapes in pastel hues on numerous looks, such as the obi-belted trousers ensemble and mini or floor-length dresses in silk twill.

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