Josep Font tapped into his love of art for these painterly pieces, and included elements from Lee Kwang-Ho’s hyper-realistic paintings of cacti, Charlotte Ager’s multilayered illustrations and Bryan Whitney’s floral photographs.

Wave-shaped fabric attached to dresses and jackets came from Whitney’s florals, while dashes of 3-D PVC embellishments and fluffed threads on shirts were drawn from Lee’s cacti. Font’s palette — red, pink, yellow, blue and green — mirrored Ager’s drawings.

These intricate details also adorned knit intarsia jumpers and the cotton and poplin dresses and shirts that were cut into a cape-style silhouette. Some of them were cinched with a water lily shaped leather belt.

Colors flowed naturally, and separates were easily mixed and matched. A neon yellow and white fil coupé shift dress stood in solidarity next to a yellow tulle shirt. Tulle also exploded from the sleeves of a relaxed pink shirt, cascaded down a red shift dress, and covered a sweeping floor-length gown.

He introduced stripes onto a capsule range of linen and silk jackets, dresses and skirts. Font played with illusion, re-piecing together the striped fabric so that stripes would change direction to create a kaleidoscopic effect.

By  on June 13, 2018

Josep Font tapped into his love of art for these painterly pieces, and included elements from Lee Kwang-Ho’s hyper-realistic paintings of cacti, Charlotte Ager’s multilayered illustrations and Bryan Whitney’s floral photographs.

Wave-shaped fabric attached to dresses and jackets came from Whitney’s florals, while dashes of 3-D PVC embellishments and fluffed threads on shirts were drawn from Lee’s cacti. Font’s palette — red, pink, yellow, blue and green — mirrored Ager’s drawings.

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