Gabriela Hearst took a bold approach to resort. Whereas most designers view it as a commercial safe hold full of bread and butter pieces, Hearst saw it as an opportunity to experiment and push design. “We tried to do a lot of different techniques and do things that are more risky,” she said during a preview. “You have a longer selling season, so we take the risk and if we fall on our face, OK.”

The lineup was full of newness — nothing too in your face, but pronounced advancement in silhouettes, colors and impressive decorative details.

Hearst used Mexican — by way of Costa Rica — ranchera singer Chavela Vargas as stylistic reference, capturing her balance of traditional Latin American folk fashion and minimalistic style in the clothes. There was an emphasis on purist white pieces — shirtdresses, pants, trenches and blouses — done with pintucked pleating on the sleeves and skirts. They were chic but every so slightly rustic in aloe linen, silk, cashmere and wool. To offset the spare styles, there were red and black Latin American graphic and floral prints, as well as giant fluffy cashmere ponchos and suiting done with fringe and cording and corsetry detail. Some of Hearst’s best experiments came in subtle pushes of volume in tailoring, such as the full skirt on a tailored coat and flared trousers. The fabrics were as upscale as they come on wool and silk cady eveningwear and super structured double-faced wool suiting.

Hearst’s bag collection grew with two new styles based on the Tiffin lunchbox system. One structured bag looked like a mini chest of drawers and could be broken down into clutches. For shoes, there were criss-cross sandals with a slight platform wedge heel, gladiators and espadrilles made with leftover scraps of fabric from the collection, a great example of simple, smart, luxurious design.

By  on June 5, 2018

Gabriela Hearst took a bold approach to resort. Whereas most designers view it as a commercial safe hold full of bread and butter pieces, Hearst saw it as an opportunity to experiment and push design. “We tried to do a lot of different techniques and do things that are more risky,” she said during a preview. “You have a longer selling season, so we take the risk and if we fall on our face, OK.”

The lineup was full of newness — nothing too in your face, but pronounced advancement in silhouettes, colors and impressive decorative details.

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