Luke and Lucie Meier’s fall Jil Sander men’s and women’s collection was a strong sophomore effort. They found solid footing in softness and comfort, contextualizing the lineup as a vision for the future, one of protection, humanity and sensitivity. An obvious way to take the house’s minimalist codes in a futuristic direction could have been purist, technical precision. “It’s not just machinery,” said Luke backstage. “We’re surrounded by technology and AI and all these things that are always in the news and in the consciousness. We thought, ‘Why can’t the future be beautiful, soft and human also?’”

The designers kept the essence of Sander’s signature simplicity with spare cuts and an abundance of white, as well as black, gray, navy and red. They breathed air and lightness into the aesthetic with tactile fabrics and silhouettes constructed to graze and float around the body. It was lovely. The opening look was an ivory blazer — tidy shoulders, short lapels — over a sheer white shirt and ivory skirt done in wide yarns of wool encased in silk organza. It was slightly padded and cushy but not bulky. A red T-shirt and skirt shaped like an oval around the hips came in gently puckered stretch material. Ribbed knits — sweaters, skirts and leggings — were cut into lightly twisted asymmetric swirls.

Tailoring was neat but not hard or plain. Jackets came with shrunken, rounded shoulders and elegantly elongated sleeves banded at the bicep. A serene beauty of a coat was done in lavender Lurex floral jacquard. Some of the looks were slung with padded down wraps pulled around shoulders or midsection like a chic, inviting hug. How refreshing it was to imagine a future where a soft landing awaits.

By  on February 24, 2018

Luke and Lucie Meier’s fall Jil Sander men’s and women’s collection was a strong sophomore effort. They found solid footing in softness and comfort, contextualizing the lineup as a vision for the future, one of protection, humanity and sensitivity. An obvious way to take the house’s minimalist codes in a futuristic direction could have been purist, technical precision. “It’s not just machinery,” said Luke backstage. “We’re surrounded by technology and AI and all these things that are always in the news and in the consciousness. We thought, ‘Why can’t the future be beautiful, soft and human also?’”

The designers kept the essence of Sander’s signature simplicity with spare cuts and an abundance of white, as well as black, gray, navy and red. They breathed air and lightness into the aesthetic with tactile fabrics and silhouettes constructed to graze and float around the body. It was lovely. The opening look was an ivory blazer — tidy shoulders, short lapels — over a sheer white shirt and ivory skirt done in wide yarns of wool encased in silk organza. It was slightly padded and cushy but not bulky. A red T-shirt and skirt shaped like an oval around the hips came in gently puckered stretch material. Ribbed knits — sweaters, skirts and leggings — were cut into lightly twisted asymmetric swirls.

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