When Massimo Giorgetti first moved to Milan in 2009, he didn’t like it very much. But it grew on him. Nearly 10 years later, “I really, really love it,” he said backstage before his fall show. He put his heart on the collection’s many sleeves with a lineup intended as a love letter to Milan. It checked the city’s major moments over the last 20 years — high-def Milano da bere style, Nineties minimalism done the maximalist Italian way, homages to iconic local spots — in a package that was sincere, energetic and very of the now.

Giorgetti infused the collection with molto Italiano spirit from all angles. All the models were Italian, some professional, some from a street casting, some friends of the label. Soccer-inspired prints on blanket scarves and sweaters paid tribute to famous Milanese bars and bakeries, including Pasticceria Cucchi, Jamaica, Bar Basso and Pravda Bar. Silky shirts were printed with cheerful “Milan! Milan! Milan” down the back, and T-shirts bore the portrait of Alessandro Manzoni, the Milanese novelist, playwright, poet and critic, whose statue stood outside Giorgetti’s show venue. The collection’s overall vibe was street-fueled exuberance, beginning with slick black faux-leather jackets and track pants, followed by shiny cherry red versions.

Giorgetti worked tracksuits every which way but sloppy. They came in sporty Eighties colorblocks and a pretty white and blue floral print, and broken up as a track jacket over white jeans tucked into matching thigh-high boots or a pair of red track pants worn with heels, a soccer sweater and printed blanket. There were sequined dresses, faux head-to-toe python and, for the finale, an explosion of vivid prints — cats, chains, flowers and the word “Milano” — on matching shirts and pleated skirts worn with supersized trainers. All the color, print and street swagger amounted to a super high-impact look that will impart Milanese bravado even to girls who don’t have a birthright to it.

By  on February 25, 2018

When Massimo Giorgetti first moved to Milan in 2009, he didn’t like it very much. But it grew on him. Nearly 10 years later, “I really, really love it,” he said backstage before his fall show. He put his heart on the collection’s many sleeves with a lineup intended as a love letter to Milan. It checked the city’s major moments over the last 20 years — high-def Milano da bere style, Nineties minimalism done the maximalist Italian way, homages to iconic local spots — in a package that was sincere, energetic and very of the now.

Giorgetti infused the collection with molto Italiano spirit from all angles. All the models were Italian, some professional, some from a street casting, some friends of the label. Soccer-inspired prints on blanket scarves and sweaters paid tribute to famous Milanese bars and bakeries, including Pasticceria Cucchi, Jamaica, Bar Basso and Pravda Bar. Silky shirts were printed with cheerful “Milan! Milan! Milan” down the back, and T-shirts bore the portrait of Alessandro Manzoni, the Milanese novelist, playwright, poet and critic, whose statue stood outside Giorgetti’s show venue. The collection’s overall vibe was street-fueled exuberance, beginning with slick black faux-leather jackets and track pants, followed by shiny cherry red versions.

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