What do you do when you are a designer with a penchant for craft, but do not want to deal with the speed the industry imposes? You create a couture label — like Yacine Aouadi.

“For me, haute couture is the last remaining part of fashion that rises above the limits of marketing and trends,” said the 35-year-old newcomer, whose freshman collection offered a refreshing dose of day in a season focused on eveningwear.

Kept mostly to a palette of black, the lineup took cues from the Victorian period, but with a modernist twist. The lines were clean and linear, spiced up with artisanal details. To wit: Aouadi embroidered little cubes of glass on lace to create tone-on-tone patterns, or he braided his garments, including a high-collar coat, from stripes of black-and-white tulle.

Elsewhere, the Balmain alumnus played with transparency by inserting trompe l’oeil tattoos, which upon closer inspection turned out to be embroideries. Contrary to his fall collection’s dark mood, Aouadi said he is not drawn to a goth-like aesthetic. “What I wish to do is to propose a wardrobe, one that’s real and that avoids the clichés of couture,” he said.

By  on July 8, 2015

What do you do when you are a designer with a penchant for craft, but do not want to deal with the speed the industry imposes? You create a couture label — like Yacine Aouadi.

“For me, haute couture is the last remaining part of fashion that rises above the limits of marketing and trends,” said the 35-year-old newcomer, whose freshman collection offered a refreshing dose of day in a season focused on eveningwear.

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