Alexandre Vauthier has a knack for integrating complex artisanal techniques while making his couture pieces look effortless. His bias-cut sequin gowns were technically impressive, for instance, as were the superfine leathers and python panels on asymmetric miniskirts paired with airy cotton shirts. The snakeskin theme was echoed in pants paved in lozenge mirrors. Vauthier also introduced vintage volumes like sweeping dresses in technical silks inspired by 20th-century Anglo-American couturier Charles James.

 

But his sporty-utilitarian looks in khaki won out. There was something in the styling and attitude that evoked editor and stylist Carine Roitfeld, who was seated front row. Out came safari dresses bound with belts, ultra-brief bandage minis and leather jumpsuits, with outerwear ranging from a glossy dark chocolate patent leather trench to parkas lined with fur. It was all predictably sassy and beautifully produced, especially Vauthier’s signature precision tailoring. Still, some of the looks felt a little too pedestrian for the couture stage.

By  on July 6, 2016

Alexandre Vauthier has a knack for integrating complex artisanal techniques while making his couture pieces look effortless. His bias-cut sequin gowns were technically impressive, for instance, as were the superfine leathers and python panels on asymmetric miniskirts paired with airy cotton shirts. The snakeskin theme was echoed in pants paved in lozenge mirrors. Vauthier also introduced vintage volumes like sweeping dresses in technical silks inspired by 20th-century Anglo-American couturier Charles James.

 

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