Pushing further into experimental territory, Japanese designer Yuima Nakazato revisited the transformable silhouettes he created in seasons past using innovative materials that featured “Brewed Protein,” a sustainable fiber developed by Japanese biotech start-up Spiber using a process not dissimilar to beer manufacturing to create artificial proteins.

Set against a backdrop that included a shower of gold particles suspended in mid-air — a sculpture titled “Goldrain,” by Japanese contemporary art studio The Eugene, meant to nod to the mechanisms that created our planet — he mixed and matched materials, delivering a cohort of pared back shift dresses, color-blocked separates and outerwear with a sporty edge about them.

Visible seams, openings and partially detached panels made good use on the promise of the Type-1 snap closure in delivering adaptable, modifiable-on-the-go garments.

Backstage, the designer reiterated that he wanted to “design a new relationship between humans and clothes,” explaining that this fiber shared properties with human skin and that it could be “not a second skin, but become part of your skin.”

Nakazato further looked to the human body for inspiration, basing his color palette on a range of natural skin tones, from fair to deep. The red touch was the hue of blood, “everyone has the same color,” he said. “That’s why we made it into the symbol of the collection.”

While trans-humanist modifications were not yet in his line sheet, Nakazato’s textiles highlighted the possibilities offered by Spiber’s innovative fiber, as thread that was crocheted; as a cotton blend used as a more conventional fabric; or even used as a leather substitute on a beige-toned sandal. Coming from someone who considers “haute couture to be the future of fashion,” this certainly read as a plausible step forward.

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By  on June 30, 2019

Pushing further into experimental territory, Japanese designer Yuima Nakazato revisited the transformable silhouettes he created in seasons past using innovative materials that featured “Brewed Protein,” a sustainable fiber developed by Japanese biotech start-up Spiber using a process not dissimilar to beer manufacturing to create artificial proteins.

Set against a backdrop that included a shower of gold particles suspended in mid-air — a sculpture titled “Goldrain,” by Japanese contemporary art studio The Eugene, meant to nod to the mechanisms that created our planet — he mixed and matched materials, delivering a cohort of pared back shift dresses, color-blocked separates and outerwear with a sporty edge about them.

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