The jaunty traffic-cone-shaped tassels on the handbags said it all: This collection was an ode to the open road — paved rather than dirt — and to the “purity and efficiency” of its graphic signage, said Anya Hindmarch. The designer, who loves a spin on a motorway with lots of reflective surfaces, decked her handbags with all manner of road-related motifs, including symbols for “men at work” and “park and ride,” as well as the logo for roadway diner chain Little Chef, done with leather marquetry and thermal-bonding techniques.

Hindmarch also showed off some new — and revisited — categories, such as coats, fur (mink and fox), scarves, knitwear and pajamas, most adorned with symbols and signs: lane markers, arrows, stop, go, yield and more. She stressed, however, that she sees these easy, “mood-altering” pieces as an extension of her accessories, rather than a full ready-to-wear launch. The presentation of this whimsical lineup culminated with a performance by The London Gay Men’s Chorus, who were dressed in bright-orange road worker gear, of course.

By  on February 24, 2015

The jaunty traffic-cone-shaped tassels on the handbags said it all: This collection was an ode to the open road — paved rather than dirt — and to the “purity and efficiency” of its graphic signage, said Anya Hindmarch. The designer, who loves a spin on a motorway with lots of reflective surfaces, decked her handbags with all manner of road-related motifs, including symbols for “men at work” and “park and ride,” as well as the logo for roadway diner chain Little Chef, done with leather marquetry and thermal-bonding techniques.

Hindmarch also showed off some new — and revisited — categories, such as coats, fur (mink and fox), scarves, knitwear and pajamas, most adorned with symbols and signs: lane markers, arrows, stop, go, yield and more. She stressed, however, that she sees these easy, “mood-altering” pieces as an extension of her accessories, rather than a full ready-to-wear launch. The presentation of this whimsical lineup culminated with a performance by The London Gay Men’s Chorus, who were dressed in bright-orange road worker gear, of course.

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