“Minimal to the Maximum.” With that show title, Tommaso Aquilano and Roberto Rimondi signaled they were ready to distance themselves from their signature Baroque embellishment. This season, the designers were inspired by the strict linear forms of the 20th-century Dutch art movement De Stijl.

“We want a more clean shape today, maintaining our approach with the Italian sartorialism, but translating it for a new era,” Aquilano said backstage. “I think it’s necessary today, because women want to be really beautiful, but with a natural attitude.”

Grid, lozenge and pin-striped patterns ran throughout the collection, which blended strict tailoring with Sixties-style coats, dresses and miniskirts with grommet trim.

The sequin embroidery was still there, except now it might be peeking out as a silver band between a gray sweater vest and pin-striped pants, or nestling on the inside sleeve of a navy funnel-neck coat with a belted Empire waist. “It’s completely wearable,” Aquilano explained.

It makes sense to suggest that women should wear these clothes not to sparkle like baubles at cocktail parties, but to go about their daily lives. The masculine coats, in particular, made a powerful case for less is more.

By  on February 28, 2015

“Minimal to the Maximum.” With that show title, Tommaso Aquilano and Roberto Rimondi signaled they were ready to distance themselves from their signature Baroque embellishment. This season, the designers were inspired by the strict linear forms of the 20th-century Dutch art movement De Stijl.

“We want a more clean shape today, maintaining our approach with the Italian sartorialism, but translating it for a new era,” Aquilano said backstage. “I think it’s necessary today, because women want to be really beautiful, but with a natural attitude.”

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