Sm-Art Deco? In an age of smartphones and watches, Bill Gaytten sought to modernize Art Deco motifs and materials. He was in step with many key trends, opening his fall show with the requisite maxi coat — as did the man whose name hangs over the door during his ready-to-wear debut earlier in the week for Maison Margiela.

 

While there were other winks to those persistent S decades — short Courrèges-esque coats and snug sweater vests — most exits weren’t overly time-stamped. Gaytten focused on vivid color, including poppy reds and orchid purples for mohair or astrakhan coats, as well as rich prints such as lamé-flecked chiffons for flowing, one-shoulder gowns and sparkly jacquards for a scallop-front minidress.

 

“Merging a youthful look with brilliant craftsmanship,” was how the designer explained his approach. It foreshadows a plan to reposition the brand in the contemporary segment and fold the signature and Galliano second lines into one. On the morning of the show, the Galliano company said it had inked a licensing agreement with Italy’s Modalis to produce its men’s and women’s ready-to-wear starting in June for the women’s resort and men’s spring 2016 seasons.

 

Modalis is based in Italy’s Umbria region and was formerly known as Studio Roscini, which dates back to 1990. Galliano recently produced its collections in-house in the wake of the financial troubles of its previous licensee, Ittierre SpA. The packed show suggests there’s still an audience for this brand’s output.

By  on March 8, 2015

Sm-Art Deco? In an age of smartphones and watches, Bill Gaytten sought to modernize Art Deco motifs and materials. He was in step with many key trends, opening his fall show with the requisite maxi coat — as did the man whose name hangs over the door during his ready-to-wear debut earlier in the week for Maison Margiela.

 

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