Last season when Yu Amatsu made his debut designing a new sub-brand for the venerable Japanese fashion house, he opened his show with evening pieces that had a distinct bridal vibe. This time, Amatsu toned down the formality, placing the emphasis squarely on daywear — namely mix-and-match separates in chic gray paired with Easter-egg pastels. Amatsu, who also designs A Degree Fahrenheit, said he was thinking about New York City’s High Line pedestrian pathway and what it represents in terms of change; he once worked in the city as a patternmaker for Marc Jacobs and Jen Kao before setting out on his own.

A sequence of show-opening looks in lace variations, including a sleeveless dress and a motorcycle jacket, were particularly pretty. Other strong pieces included a sleek, color-blocked dress slit to one hip and paired with languid, wide-legged pants as well as a tailored suit and two short dresses done in abstract geometric prints. Bold intersecting lines also zigzagged their way across blouses, a skirt and fur coats, giving them a modernist vibe.

By  on March 20, 2015

Last season when Yu Amatsu made his debut designing a new sub-brand for the venerable Japanese fashion house, he opened his show with evening pieces that had a distinct bridal vibe. This time, Amatsu toned down the formality, placing the emphasis squarely on daywear — namely mix-and-match separates in chic gray paired with Easter-egg pastels. Amatsu, who also designs A Degree Fahrenheit, said he was thinking about New York City’s High Line pedestrian pathway and what it represents in terms of change; he once worked in the city as a patternmaker for Marc Jacobs and Jen Kao before setting out on his own.

A sequence of show-opening looks in lace variations, including a sleeveless dress and a motorcycle jacket, were particularly pretty. Other strong pieces included a sleek, color-blocked dress slit to one hip and paired with languid, wide-legged pants as well as a tailored suit and two short dresses done in abstract geometric prints. Bold intersecting lines also zigzagged their way across blouses, a skirt and fur coats, giving them a modernist vibe.

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