Barbara Casasola said she wanted to dress “a free woman; both cerebral and nonchalant” with this collection. She forgot to add exhibitionist to her criteria.

 

The Brazilian designer opened with a hooded camel coat slipping off the shoulder to offer a flash of a bra that was so sheer the model may well not have bothered. Sexy in this instance, yes, but less successful in Casasola’s experiments with the gauzy silk knit — in taupe, gray and sulfuric green — which she used for minimal dresses and drawstring trousers worn with funnel-neck T-shirts.

 

Drawstrings were everywhere — too prevalent, in fact. They appeared on the hems or at the sides of skirts; on the cuff of a white one-shouldered dress; up the sides and along the shoulders of coated cotton dresses; and at the bottom of a cropped jacket. They were perhaps intended to convey the sense of “tension and release” the designer said she was trying to achieve, but the idea was a touch overcooked here.

 

The strongest points were the coats and tailoring. The gray cashmere coat with a scarf neckline looked elegant and luxurious, and her high-waist, wide-leg pants were very fetching.

By  on February 21, 2016

Barbara Casasola said she wanted to dress “a free woman; both cerebral and nonchalant” with this collection. She forgot to add exhibitionist to her criteria.

 

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