During a visit to Greg Chait’s The Elder Statesman boutique in New York to see his fall collection, the designer, wearing his newest tartan-plaid cashmere robe, admitted he is “obsessed” with yarns — cashmere in particular. So much so that he is personally involved in all the hand-spinning, knitting, weaving, plying and designing of the collection, for which the cashmere travels from Italy to villages in Central America to Los Angeles, where it is produced.

 

He talked about the beauty of and reason for one-ply sweaters rather than five-, six- or seven-ply that consumers associate with heightened luxury. “I make the yarn thicker rather than plying up the yarns,” he said. “This gives a lightness with body not bulk.”

 

The result was a fabulous collection of mostly oversize cashmere crewnecks in optical-illusion prints, tie-dye or a range of solids, complemented by pieces such as a white pop-stitch bodysuit, a skinny T-shirt dress and a cashmere-lined tech-fabric jacket. Chait pointed to a black pullover with a sewn-on braid snaking across the front and back as a favorite. He also surprised with subtle touches of whimsy by adding occasional contrasting patches of color or his tiny embroidered initials. “I want all of our pieces to have soul,” he said.

By  on February 18, 2016

During a visit to Greg Chait’s The Elder Statesman boutique in New York to see his fall collection, the designer, wearing his newest tartan-plaid cashmere robe, admitted he is “obsessed” with yarns — cashmere in particular. So much so that he is personally involved in all the hand-spinning, knitting, weaving, plying and designing of the collection, for which the cashmere travels from Italy to villages in Central America to Los Angeles, where it is produced.

 

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