Contrary to widespread belief, chronicling street style is not a creation of the digital age. (Our WWD forebears were observing, writing about and illustrating the fashions of the street as far back as the Twenties, when the “They are Wearing” logo was copyrighted.) Tory Burch has a thing for the Seventies sort, inspired by “L’Amour l’après-midi,” Éric Rohmer’s exploration of marital love and extracurricular lust, particularly the café scene in which the protagonist daydreams about various women, objects of desire, coming and going. If that’s not a hook for a collection, what is?

 

Happily, Burch invoked the Seventies’ motif with deft skill, her silhouettes making clear, but not excessive, reference. And to keep it all fresh, she wove in equestrian elements for a smart collection that evoked jet-set days without cliché.

 

Burch has a particular knack for channeling her natural decorative impulses into practical, unfussy clothes. She opened boldly with a multicolor coat in geometric patterns taken from jockey silks; the oversize diamond would prove a recurring motif. The graphics continued in good-looking, clean pieces: peacoat; slick eel-skin skirt paired to white shirt with mismatched color-blocked sleeves; racy jacket over track jacket and white jodhpurs. (The jacket was one of several Tory Sport pieces available immediately at retail.)

 

Lest the structured graphics overwhelm, Burch pulled back on the pattern for versatile outerwear, including a jacquard trench worn over a slightly longer chain-print silk dress to lovely effect. She went otherwise soft with fluid dresses and a fabulous diamond-pattern evening gown that wore its glamour with a young, casual attitude.

By  on February 16, 2016

Contrary to widespread belief, chronicling street style is not a creation of the digital age. (Our WWD forebears were observing, writing about and illustrating the fashions of the street as far back as the Twenties, when the “They are Wearing” logo was copyrighted.) Tory Burch has a thing for the Seventies sort, inspired by “L’Amour l’après-midi,” Éric Rohmer’s exploration of marital love and extracurricular lust, particularly the café scene in which the protagonist daydreams about various women, objects of desire, coming and going. If that’s not a hook for a collection, what is?

 

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