Nadège Vanhee-Cybulski, women’s creative director of Hermès, hit on a good idea with her fall collection: By melding its famous printed scarves with clinging knits, she turned out some of the sultriest full-cover dresses seen on a Paris catwalk. Imagine a turtleneck or round-necked sweater melting into a long bias-cut gown.

 

She also inlaid double-faced cashmere with panels of leather, yielding jackets, sweatshirts and tanks with a “riding spirit,” according to the press notes. Indeed, the diamond patterns in the sweatshirt could be seen as an abstracted jockey silk — minus the snaps and a plus string of zeros on the ticket price.

 

This was a luxurious and mostly handsome collection, with roomy sleeves and long, slanted hemlines heightening a monastic mood.

 

The show opened awkwardly with models emerging from a glossy yellow tunnel in boxy and stiff ensembles in densely quilted satin in a brassy color. It then fell into a more languid rhythm aided by generous helpings of double-face cashmere, supple shearling and lambskin occasionally scattered with palladium studs.

 

Cropped pants and zippered tops kept the brand rooted in the equestrian world, as did tall, glossy boots with chunky heels that made a hefty clomp.

By  on March 7, 2016

Nadège Vanhee-Cybulski, women’s creative director of Hermès, hit on a good idea with her fall collection: By melding its famous printed scarves with clinging knits, she turned out some of the sultriest full-cover dresses seen on a Paris catwalk. Imagine a turtleneck or round-necked sweater melting into a long bias-cut gown.

 

To continue reading this article...

load comments