If fashion and art are indeed first cousins, then “Framed,” Olympia Le-Tan’s imaginative proposal for fall, had roots in that genealogical tree. The blithesome designer provided a potpourri of dazzling prints and patterns, borrowed directly from her favorite painters, including David Hockney and Takashi Murakami, which she appropriated to match her quirky, tongue-in-cheek universe.

 

The show’s arty makeup — a mini-performance set in Emmanuel Perrotin’s Marais gallery, featuring Sabine Getty as “the rich art collector,” Cleo Le-Tan as “her busy assistant” and Paul Hameline as “the studio muse” — reflected the theme with a good dose of humor.

 

Perrotin and Le-Tan go way back. “My father exhibited in his gallery when I was a girl,” the designer revealed backstage. A year ago, the art dealer approached her to reinterpret the work of some of the artists he represented, including Erró, Kaws and Sophie Calle, into her signature clutches. The idea matured and turned into a full-fledged collection.

 

Clin d’oeil paint smudges dripped from the lapels of the girls’ tweed jackets which Le-Tan playfully rendered in contrasting patterns. Ditto for a series of double-breasted corduroy suits with cropped wide-leg bottoms and oversize boyfriend coats.

 

This season’s unusually masculine aesthetic also worked well on lean high-neck, shawl-collared shirts paired with roomy dungarees boasting big cuffs, or as a counterbalance to full, billowy skirts. There were curvy minis and pencil dresses, too, though it wasn’t their sinuous lines that drew attention, but the artful sequin and bead embroideries that retraced real-life art works. One number seemed like an exact reproduction of Elmgreen & Dragset’s “Safe/Dot painting,” a spoof of Damien Hirst’s famed spot series.

By  on March 5, 2016

If fashion and art are indeed first cousins, then “Framed,” Olympia Le-Tan’s imaginative proposal for fall, had roots in that genealogical tree. The blithesome designer provided a potpourri of dazzling prints and patterns, borrowed directly from her favorite painters, including David Hockney and Takashi Murakami, which she appropriated to match her quirky, tongue-in-cheek universe.

 

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