Husband-and-wife design duo Laura Vassar and Kris Brock, who took home the top prize at the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund Awards in November, set out with a simple intention for fall at Brock Collection: to make their woman feel good. “With the nature of everything happening in fashion and in the world right now, we just wanted to embrace and love her this season,” Vassar said backstage after the show. “That meant offering her clothes that either she wants to live in and can wear every day, or superemotional pieces that she can feel her very best in.”

More specifically, Brock said he and Vassar homed in on a modern approach to Victorian style, working old-world silhouettes — think puff-sleeved blouses and hand-pleated bustiers — into everyday pieces. Brockened likened the looks to “the sort you see in fairy-tale portraits.” A purple tweed midiskirt with an ultra-high corseted waist, worn with a cashmere bell-sleeved sweater, was a well-executed example. Ditto a silk georgette, floral-printed mididress that didn’t exactly qualify as “everyday,” but nevertheless gave an air of relaxed confidence when paired, smartly, with tomboy brogues. It was the emotional pieces that Vassar referred to that stole the show — as in a sumptuous off-the-shoulder mink overcoat — but all of it bore an easy elegance. For the flirt, a red gingham bustier with a matching ruffled pencil skirt should fit the bill.

By  on February 9, 2017

Husband-and-wife design duo Laura Vassar and Kris Brock, who took home the top prize at the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund Awards in November, set out with a simple intention for fall at Brock Collection: to make their woman feel good. “With the nature of everything happening in fashion and in the world right now, we just wanted to embrace and love her this season,” Vassar said backstage after the show. “That meant offering her clothes that either she wants to live in and can wear every day, or superemotional pieces that she can feel her very best in.”

More specifically, Brock said he and Vassar homed in on a modern approach to Victorian style, working old-world silhouettes — think puff-sleeved blouses and hand-pleated bustiers — into everyday pieces. Brockened likened the looks to “the sort you see in fairy-tale portraits.” A purple tweed midiskirt with an ultra-high corseted waist, worn with a cashmere bell-sleeved sweater, was a well-executed example. Ditto a silk georgette, floral-printed mididress that didn’t exactly qualify as “everyday,” but nevertheless gave an air of relaxed confidence when paired, smartly, with tomboy brogues. It was the emotional pieces that Vassar referred to that stole the show — as in a sumptuous off-the-shoulder mink overcoat — but all of it bore an easy elegance. For the flirt, a red gingham bustier with a matching ruffled pencil skirt should fit the bill.

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